Great Western Railway Journal Volume 1 onwards

These pages are  now as developed as those relating to BackTrack. Note the term narrow gauge for non-broad gauge is not used, as standard gauge is far simpler. Similarly, the twenty-four hour system is always used for times. There are problems with autocars, railmotors, etc where push & pull and steam railcar are normally the preferred terms on this website. Searchers for information about the Great Western Railway may also be interested in the page relating to Great Western locomotive design.

Issue Numbers

Preview 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Publisher 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
Home 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75
76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Special Cornish Issue
Preview Issue (October 1991)

Note: this followed two special Issues of British Railway Journal devoted to the Great Western Railway

'Castle' class 4-6-0 No. 5020 Trernaton Castle at the head of an up South Wales express at Patchway station during the latter 1930s. G.H. Soole. Front cover
Black & white photograph

Beale, Gerry. Maiden Newton — a Wessex Country junction. 3-28.
Section of broad gauge railway opened from Yeovil to Weymouth on 20 January 1857. This line was single track: it is not clear when passing fasclities were provided at Maiden Newton, but presumably in time for the opening of the Bridport Railway on 12 November 1857 (this was also reluctantly broad gauge). The line was converted to standard gauge in 1874 and the line either side of Maiden Newton was doubled in 1881, but double track did reach all the way to Dorchester until May 1885. See also letters in Issue 1 from A.J. Parkes on irregular stopping of trains for trainee policemen at Chantmarle House and how W.H. Smith had newspapers dropped off near the drive to same country seat. Letter from R.N. Johnston on page 220 who describes nature of signalling at Maiden Newton and how through trains to Bridport must have been worked..

Book Review, 28.
The Golden Age of the GWR 1895-1914,

Copsey, John. The '47xxs' at work. 29-43.
Includes general arrangement drawings (elevations and plan) dated 1920: thus not clear whether fitted with No. 1 or No. 7 boiler. Usual discussion of allocations and workings, mainly freight, but also express passenger workings. Ray Caston letter in Issue 2 page 88 noting trial running to Carmarthen or Neyland and statement that long rigid wheelbase may have precluded their use in Wales, but they worked regularly to Shrewsbury!.

43XX No. 6320 with down H class freight passing Denchworth on 20 August 1938, H.E. Simmons (phot,). 44

Squibb, Peter. Be brief - use code. 45-6.
Article on Telegraphic Code. See also letter on page 44 in Issue 1 from D.E. Bird on how telegraphic codes were used on other British railways, and from J.W.P. Rowledge on page 220 on code words Grove and Deepdene, and in Issue 2 page 88 letter from Ray Caston who discusses use of codes for Royal Trains: Grove (from 1942) and Deepdene drom 1949, also mentions TO(RR) Tuesdays only runs if required and change by 1944 from Mex to Ox and Mex B to Oxfit..

Shed scene [Exeter shed yard], G.N. Southerden (phot.). 47.
With 517 class 0-4-2T No. 831 on 20 April 1927.

GWR 6-ton yard cranes. 48-51.
Drawing 87318, Swindon, November 1928; photograph of type at Henley-on-Thames, and drawing No. 104469, Swindon, November 1934.

Copsey, John. Westbury at the turn of the century. 52-5.
Based on two photographs showing new station and old blast furnace (latter not mentioned in text); one includes 517 class 0-4-2T No. 1434 on local train. Map.

Gray, Fred. A clerestory coach story. 56-9.
Restoration of Dean bogie compartment coach No. 1941, formerly W14198 Engineering Department.

Paddington-Ticket Window (photo.), 60,

Advert, the GW in S. Devon, rear cover

Number 1 (January 1992)

Star class 4021 British Monarch at Oxford in 1939. P.H. Colebourn. front cover.
Early colour photograph: Hall class? alongside

Denham to Uxbridge (High Street).  Stanley C. Jenkins. 1-20.
Line opened in 1907 and was slowly elecrocuted by Metropolitan Railway and London Transport, not helped by the failure to connect the line to the Vine Street branch and construct a new station to serve some form of loop line service.

Castles in Wales. John Copsey. 21-8.
Official general arrangement drawings, plans and cross sections, mainly from 1923 (see letter from Guy Williams Issue 2 page 88 observing that cab floor apears to be too high on drawings): allocations and duties. Illus.: 5016 Montgomery Castle on Goring troughs on down train for Swansea in 1938 (M.W. Earley); 5030 Shirburn Castle on up train from South Wales at Reading West Junction in 1943 (M.W. Earley); 5016 arriving Cardiff with six coaches from Swansea on 12 July 1952 (R.C. Riley); 4094 Dynevor Castle and 5056 Earl of Powys changing at Cardiff. (RCR)

A familiar landmark at Reading... Mike Christensen. 29-30.
Two illus. of bracket signals by H.F. Wheeler and P.J. Garland. Former was at eastern end of down main platform and had arms on both sides, some of which had destinations ("main" and "to SE&CR") painted on them. View was taken on 10 May 1936 and includes 3451 Pelican on up Main. Latter shows reverse of signals, but at a latter date. See also letters in Issue 2 page 88 from A.C. Russell and from G.J.A. White who cites a later installation (as photographed in 1948) in Adrian Vaughan's Pictorial record of Great Western signalling. .

GWR boundary markers. Fred Gray. 31.
Five photographs (by Lawrence Waters) show some of the markers identified by the Great Western Trust.

Westbourne Park shed (Shed Scene). 32-3.
c1905: locomotives clearly visible include 4-2-2 Great Western and Metro tank No. 3594.

Bristol Temple Meads. M.E.J. Deane (phot.). 34-5.
Colour illus. 6932 Burwarton Hall departing with westbound excursion? train. Locomotive is highly polished with white headlamps: rail tour?

Cordons. John Lewis. 36-40.
Gas tank wagons for conveying oil gas. New tanks (receivers) and replacement underframes could be fitted whilst the vehicle reatined its existing number: in some cases duplicate vehicles were in service at the same time. This makes historical research difficult.

Neath (Riverside). M.E.J. Deane. (phot.). 42-3.
Colour illus: 0-6-0PT awaits departure for Brecon on passenger train, whilst 56XX passes above with freight.

Letters. 44
Maiden Newton, A.J. Parkes.
See Preview Issue page 3 et seq: writer trained at No. 7 District Police Training Centre at Chantmarle House and in 1951 the constables under training used to tip the driver of the last train from Dorchester to stop the train at a bridge under the drive to the House: this stopped following the Commandant hearing the train pulling away. When Chantmarle House was owned by the W.H. Smith family newspapers were thrown out by the guard at the same point.
Maiden Newton. I.D. Beale (phot.)
Illustration of the bridge under the approach to Chantmarle House.
Maiden Newton, Peter Squibb.
The operation of removing the excess train staffs from Miaden Newton, which had to be an even number and were conveyed in a special leather container.
Be brief – use code. D.E. Bird.
See feature in Prelininary Issue page 45. Telegraph Code: standardization between the railway companies: less used on the Southern Railway (greater use of telephones). Involvement of Railway Clearing House (RCH). Royal codes kept secret. Under Railway Executive some private codes (GWR BOXER) became public as did LNER BROMIDE (wire full details of despatch). LIBNA (light engine left for) appears in the British Railways Code book for 1953 but was not used on Great Eastern Section of Eastern Region.

Number 2

Ross-on-Wye. William H. Smith. 46-64.

4507: the last of a line. Gerry Beale. 65-73.
Last locomotive to be constructed at Wolverhampton. Led to correspondence from

On the 20th May...[1892]. John Copsey. 74-5.
End of the broad gauge: train service on final day. It is not clear whether the illus is a genuine memento of that day.

Cordons. Part 2. John Lewis. 76-81+
Includes the thirty receiver and nine-tank standard vehicles.

Marsh Mills Signal Box. R.C. Riley (phot.). 87.
Colour illus. of interior looking towards Bickleigh in 1961.

Letters. 88
'Castles' in Wales. Guy Williams.
See Issue 1 page 21: writer is critical of general arrangement drawing suggesting that the floor of the cab is too high: see also letter from Des Williams (p. 220) who suggests that No. 4000 (rebuilt North Star) had a higher cab floor height. See also Issue 3 page 131 letters from R.C. Ormiston-Chant  who noted that cabsides were left in situ during boiler lifts at Swindon, if mainframes were replaced then the cabside provided the locomotive's "identity"and from Mike Cassey.who identifies the names behind the initials on the general arrangement diagrams.
'Castles' in Wales. Ray Caston.
See Number 1 page 21: involvement of Newport (Ebbw Junction) enginemen in South Wales to Paddington workings prior to WW2. The banks at Cockett were formidable, but the hardest work was the climb from the Severn Tunnel to Saperton and on to Sapperton.
'Castles' in Wales. Len Rees.
See Number 1 page 21: Drivers found the BR Britannia class much easier to prepare (it was a filthy task to lubricate the inside valve gear). The seats on the Britannias were far more comfortable and the controls were better placed. The firemen were less concerned with the difference between the two classes.
Familiar landmark at Reading. A.C. Russell.
See Issue 1 page 29 (comment on location of diamond track circuit markers).
Familiar landmark at Reading.  G.J.A. White.
See Issue 1 page 29: cites a later installation (as photographed in 1948) in Adrian Vaughan's Pictorial record of Great Western signalling
Be brief — use code. Ray Caston.
See feature in Prelininary Issue page 45.discusses use of codes for Royal Trains: Grove (from 1942) and Deepdene drom 1949, also mentions TO(RR) Tuesdays only runs if required and change by 1944 from Mex to Ox and Mex B to Oxfit; also earlier comment in feature on class 47XX (Preview Issue page 29) noting trial running to Carmarthen or Neyland and statement that long rigid wheelbase may have precluded their use in Wales, but they worked regularly to Shrewsbury!

Number 3

'Hall' class 4-6-0 No. 6991 Acton Burnell Hall passing Westbourne Bridge with the 3.55 p.m. Paddington to South Wales train on Saturday, 13th July 1957. R.C. Riley. front cover
Carrying Capitals United Express headboard and formed of chocolate & cream stock: A.C. Taylor (page 220) queries if Hall was substitute for Castle.

Banbury – the shed, the engines and the men. John Copsey and Michael Clifton. 90-104.
Briefly a temporary shed existed for the broad gauge between 1850 and 1852 about which very little is known. Banbury became a junction in 1887 and locomotives were then allocated. A permanent shed was erected in 1889. Following the link to the GCR in 1900 there was a greater need and a new engine shed was opened on 24 August 1908 (there are both interior and exterior views of this structure). There was a great increase in traffic during WW1 and a new marshalling yard was opened in 1929 (see also Br. Rly J., 1987 (18), page 355 et seq). Traffic peaked in WW2 when for a time LNER O4 class 2-8-0s were allocated and these were followed by S260 US Army 2-8-0s. Extra fascilities had to be provided which included a new coaling stage and a lifting shop. Oil storage and fuelling fascilities were provided in 1947. Other illus.: 2282 with ex ROD tender on 26 April 1936; 3030 on F class freight on 22 July 1939; 6854 Roundhill Grange on 11.24 Shefield Victoria to Poole relief express on 22 July 1939; official views of shed (and its improvements) taken om 3 November 1942 and 5 August 1943; 6839 Hewell Grange on 22 July 1939; and 1473 on Kingham auto on 18 September 1948. 

GWR Swindon 8-inch water cranes. 105.
Official drawing No. 2918.

'Kings' on the Northern Line. John Copsey. 109-17.
Pattern of workings: also includes detailed working drawings (82100, Swindon 1927).

Lewis, John. A GWR 'nondescript' saloon. 118-19.
G58 numbers 9101-9110 could be used either as first or third class vehicles either on private hire or in excursions: illustrations show type at Hereford in June 1949 possibly being used as a temporary office. See also letter from Bob Crawley (p. 264) which states that bracket signal visible in illus. on p. 118 was angled obliquely for sighting purposes on sharply curved Brecon curve. See also letters on page 220 from B. Hillier who asked why signal on illus p. 118 was angled obliquely (see preceding reply) and from Mick Haynes who noted that vehicle being restored at Bewdley was No. 9103..

Trowbridge station with auto trailer No. 13. 120-1.
Two-page spread: view taken in 1905/6 when Trowbridge had several railmotor and autocar workings.

Clevedon branch. 122-3.
Photo-feature: 1412 arriving Yatton with two auto trailers colour (M.E.J. Deane); Celevedon terminus with different 14xx (as previous); Clevedon terminus b&w (P.J. Garland).

Reading. 124-6.
Two page spread illustration of  station frontage with SECR entrance on right taken on 8 June 1928 and further view of Station Hill with hoardings (showing Rock of Gibraltar) presumably taken at same time.

Pontardulais home signal (bracket type). P.J. Garland (phot.). 126.
Colour illus. of three arm with centre arm carrying distant signal for Pontardulais North beneath

5964 Wolesley Hall on milk empties (mainly tank wagons, but also some vans) near Denchworth on 20 August 1938. H.E. Simmons (phot.). 128

Murder in the air. Freddie Sadler. 129.
How the electric telegraph at Slough was used to intercept the murderer, John Tawell, at Paddington on 1 January 1845

The Great Western Trust. Peter Rance. 130.
Collection of small items: colour illustrationincludes a Grimsby Box supplied by J.H. Dobson of Grimsby used to contain an engine driver's tools.

Letters. 131-2.
No. 4507. S.C. Bromhall.
See feature by Gerry Beale in Number 2: dates when 45xx and 44xx were equipped with enlarged bunkers; also sliding shutters to cab, and in case of 4507 when equipped with ATC appartus.
'Castles' in Wales. R.C. Ormiston-Chant.
See letter by Guy Williams in Number 2 page 88:notes that cabsides were left in situ during boiler lifts at Swindon, if mainframes were replaced then the cabside provided the locomotive's "identity". .
'Castles' in Wales. Mike Casey.
See letter by Guy Williams in Number 2 page 88: identifies the names of the draughtsmen behind the initials on Swindon general arrangement diagrams, notably FCM=Frank Mattingley and SJS=Sid Smith. .
On the 20th May. G.A. Hookham.

See feature in Number 2 on how the broad gauge Mail was brought to Weston-super-Mare over the old branch line, before the mainline was converted to standard gauge as the Loop had been opened with standard gauge.
Matters arising. Peter Squibb.
See letter by Ray Caston in Number 2 on Royal train codes, also how a signalman at Marston Magna intercepted a 47xx on Weymouth branch which led to its removal at Yeovil Pen Mill.
Matters arising. Michael Hale.
See ..: dates of opening and closure of Ross to Monmouth line. Construction of boilers for 45xx at Swindon, although locomotives erected at Wolverhampton.

Book review. 132
Isambard Kingdom Brunel: engineering knight-errant, Adrian Vaughan. John Murray. TB.
Makes clear that this is not hagiography

Number 4.(Autumn 1992)

'14XX' class 0-4-2T No. 1451 in the Exe Valley bay at Exeter St. David's on Wednesday, 5th July 1961. R.C. Riley. front cover

Beale, Gerry. Dorchester. 134-51; 168-72.
Contains reproductions of plans and elevations of original broad gauge Wilts, Somerset & Weymouth Railway station buildings at Dorchester plus photograph taken in 1856 of station under construction (also colour photograph by R.C. Riley of station building in 1956). Describes early signalling, especially juction with standard gauge London & South Western Railway (see British Railway Journal for description of its station at Dorchester). Includes plans and elevations for enlargement of station in 1899. Train services (both freight and passenger including through workings to Paddington) are described. or listed. The decline into Dorchester West is recorded: fortunately the former "train station" is a listed building and was serving as a Chinese restaurant at time article was written. Illus.Bulldog on down express leaving station in 1908 (E. Pouteau); page 144 (lower) steam railcar (rail motor) No. 46 with head board noting halts en route to Weymouth (also visible 0-6-0ST on Bridport branch train and Bulldog on up express (E. Pouteau); wooden overall roof c1930 (removed 1934); Dorchester Junction in September 1931

GWR standard tube fencing and gates. 152.

Copsey, John. The final years of the 'Metros'. 153-60.
Includes general arrangement drawings (elevation and plan, latter dated June 1898 and numbered 14503). Design of 2-4-0T originated in 1869 and locomotives continued to be built until 1899. There were 'small', 'medium' and 'large' varieties and they were used on London suburban services for many years and some were fitted with condensing apparatus. By January 1935 few were located in the London area and the residual stock was allocated in the west. Some were auto-fitted (push & pull). Allocations and turns are listed for March 1938; and the allocations for December 1946 and January 1949. Illus.: Metro No. 1498 between Wantage Road and Challow with down local (four coach corridor train and at least one van) on Sunday 26 June 1938 (H.E. Simmons); Metro No. 1420 on Truro shed c1932; No. 3564 at Southall on 22 June 1932 (H.F. Wheeler); cab of condensing No. 3591 at Old Oak Common on 9 May 1934; 3582 at Fowey during 1948; 3582 leaving Strap Lane Halt in 1935 and 3586 at Llantrisant station with Penygraig auto service (push & pull) on 12 June 1948;. See also letter from D.A. Picton (p. 219) who remembered No. 1499 shunting at Day's Junction in 1943-4 and Metros working autocars on Severn Beach line in 1930s.

Eacock, Kenneth. Hereford pilot. 161-2.
No. 2920 Saint David assisted poor condition Castle on express on North & West route to Shrewsbury in summer of 1951: note assisting engine worked inside the train engine. Illus. of locomotive as in 1952 (BR lined black).

GWR fire grates for water cranes. 162

Russell-Smith, J.F. (phot.). 'F' class freights.163-5.
Bulldog 3454 Skylark approachin Swindon on 24 October 1951 on down freight; No. 6979 Helperley Hall on freight being banked up 1 in 66 from Westbury towards Warminster near Upper Scudamore on 17 April 1951.

Riley, R.C. (phot.). Acton West. 166-7.
Colour photo-feature: two-page spread: condensing 97XX No. 9704 on local trip working being overhauled by No. 6123 on class A suburban passenger formed of non-corridor stock on 30 August 1956.

Tanat Valley with train and gated crossing being opened. (photograph) 173
See letters on page 219 from A. Foster and Alan Rhodes for further informaation: crossing was at Porthywaen. Locomotive was ex-Cambrian Railways 2-4-0T No. 1196. Rodes suggests an earlier (no later than mid-1930s) date than Foster (pre-1948).

Book review. 173
Welsh steam: railway photographs at the National Library of Wales. Gwyn Briwnant-Jones. UCWP, TB
Interesting collection of photographs, mainly pre-GWR, with excellent captions and bibliography.

Riley, R.C. (phot.). Laira: Shed scene. 174-5
Colour photo-feature: two-page spread: 7823 Hook Norton Manor on Sunday 15 July 1956 (livery appears to be unlined black with lion on wheel emblem on tender; 0-6-0PT No. 3629 shunter on coaling stage above: caption notes Laira Turn 86  for Summer 1953. E.S. Youldon (letter p. 219) corrects dates for arrival of locomotives mentioned at Laira and Newton Abbot: 1948, not 1949 and mentions that Manors worked between Plymouth and Exeter via Okehampton to prepare for when the tide was high..

Letters. 176
Cornish matters. I.E. Herbert.
See feature on page 3 et seq of Cornish Special Issue: commented on motive power, observing that between 1938 and 1948 No. 4500 was virtually the permanent locomotive at St Ives; in theory No. 4407 was intended for the Hayle Wharf branch but frequently worked the Penzance St Ives turn. Wonders why 4575 series was banned from branch. Haulage of evacuees to St Ives (possibly by Nos 4500 and 4407); stopping of trains before descent into station; ticket collection at Carbis Bay as St Ives was an open station; traffic to Lelant; the B sets used on the branch. Refers also to china clay traffic article (page 43): noted failure to mention 2181 locomotives (2021 class rebuilt with extra braking). This part of the letter received a response from R.C. Riley on page 220: 0-6-0PTs Nos. 2181 and 2182 were at St. Blazey to work Goonbarrow branch: latter lasted until 1955; and from R.C. Ormiston-Chant who noted that Nos. 2181-2190 were equipped with larger brake cylinders for working four coach trains..
Cornish matters. P. English.
Refers to china clay traffic article (page 43): stressed that coal was not carried in clay wagons. page 50: Melangoose Mill clay works on Retew branch  suggests that caption is incorrect, especially direction towards Retew; Page 53 English China Clays wagons identifies as Treviscoe sidings on St Dennis to Burngullow branch (area also known as Kernick)
Cornish matters. Roy Hart.
See feature on page 3 et seq of Cornish Special Issue: commented on mixed gauge track from St Erth to Lelant, also working of mixed gauge freight trains; 45XX class was authorized from 1931; board at St Erth which indicated types permitted on branch; 90XX permitted from 1945; some errors in description of St Erth signal box, working the Porthia Clay Co's siding near St Erth; detailed notes on the nomenclature of signals at St Ives, length of loop at St Ives, and means employed for single line working Refers also to china clay traffic article (page 43): noted that St Dennis to Burngullow section was closed for twenty years due to dispute over mineral rights at Carpella..

Number 5 (Winter 1993)

An up train at Snow Hill station, Birmingham, behind '51XX' class 2-6-2T No. 4111, in June 1959. P.J. Garland. front cover.

Copsey, John. The '61xxs' in the Great Western era . 178-88.
See also letters on page 264 from Roy Williams who was a fireman at Slough, claimed that class was capable of very high speed from J.E. Norris use of 61XX type plus single autocar as replacement for diesel railcar working between Oxford and Hereford during period 1938/9; and fromGeoff Goslin who queried why all the large Prairies were fitted with lever reverse in spite of clear evidence that 61XX were used on fast workings.

Karau, Paul. Lad porter. 189-92.
Bill Wall of Fairford started work at Bampton in 1928: the station was renamed Brize Norton and Bampton after the establishment of the RAF Airfield.

Copsey, John. Horse box traffic on passenger trains. 193-5.

College Wood timber viaduct on the former Cornwall Railway Ian C. Allen (phot.). 196-7.
Falmouth branch showing the final phase of the viaduct's existence as the new viaduct was being erected behind. 4575 2-6-2T crossing with three coach train consisting of autocar, six-wheel? brake third or composite and modern non-corridor coach. Letter from R.C. Riley (page 396) states that locomotive was No. 5530, the date was August 1933 and photographer: Dr. Ian C. Allen

'5101' class general arrangement drawing. 198-9.
Side, front and rear elevations and plan. Swindon No. 87341, February 1934. Note by Editor questions if Swindon produced separate drawings for 61XX class, although drawing states that boiler mount arrangements covered both classes.

Large Prairie 2-6-2T under construction or major repair. 200-1
Locomotive with boiler upon frames and painted, but lacking cab and bunker, viewed from obliquely above, thus trailing axle normally hidden by bunker clearly visible. Letter from Bob Crawley: claims that semi-complete locomotive is in AE shop at Swindon of Lot 259 Nos. 5160-89. See also letter from S.C. Bromhall (page 308) who argues that locomotive illsutrated was 61XX and questions why ATC gear was not fitted to original batch of this class and notes that the fully painted, but semi-complete nature of the locomotive is indicative of GWR painting methods.

Hemyock. 202-6.
Black & white photo-feature: two double-page spreads, plus one other (from Neil Parkhouse collection): ex-South Devon Railway 2-4-0T at Hemyock; verdant view showing parts of lamp room and goods shed; and original siding which served the Culm Valley Dairy: caption states "butter factory"

GWR pot type sleepering. 206.
Diagrams probably prepared during WW2 for construction of new loops at Lavington and Woodborough: concrete pots with tie bars.

Tenby. P.J. Garland (phot.). 207.
Colour photographs of No. 5673 leaving Tenby with freight for Pembroke on 24 May 1963. Modern flat-roofed signal box visible in upper photograph.

Williams, Dennis.  '47XX' from Birkenhead. 208-10.
Firing No. 4704: possibly gives more information about relationships between drivers and fireman than about the nature of the locomotive: nevertheless the locomotive appeared to steam well if properly fired. Illus. No. 4704 at Old Oak Common on 10 May 1958 (J.A. Peden); No. 4704 at Morpeth Dock, Birkenhead during 1950s; No. 4708 approaching lifting bridge in Morpeth Dock with freight on 29 April 1958 (J.A. Peden).

Turner, Chris and  Copsey, John. Early turn at St. Ives. 211-15.
Duties of the night shift shedman, Tommy Bassett, who coaled the 45XX and cleaned it ready for the early turn. The two drivers at St Ives were Alf Holloway and Arthur Williams (who had an artificial leg) and firemen Mike Adams and Edward Ralph. Adams and Holloway are shown in photograph: former was a  kean swimmer. Col. illus. by Peter W. Gray of 4564 being got ready for service. Plan of engine shed.

Lewis, John. Birmingham Division suburban trains. 216-19
Standard A Sets with seating accommodation tabulated formed of 70ft non-corridor stock used on Leamington services; C sets working from Stourbridge Junction; and B sets (not as per Cornwall) used on North Warwicks line.

Letters. 219-20.
'Manors' at Laira. E.S. Youldon.
See page 174: corrects dates for arrival of locomotives mentioned at Laira and Newton Abbot: 1948, not 1949 and mentions that Manors worked between Plymouth and Exeter via Okehampton to prepare for when the tide was high..
'Metros'. D.A. Picton.
See page 153: remembered No. 1499 shunting at Day's Junction in 1943-4 and Metros working autocars on Severn Beach line in 1930s.
The Tanat question. A. Foster.
See page 173: crossing was at Porthywaen. Locomotive was ex-Cambrian Railways 2-4-0T 1196 type date pre-1948..
The Tanat question. Alan Rhodes.
See page 173: crossing was at Porthywaen. Locomotive was ex-Cambrian Railways 2-4-0T No. 1196; suggests no later than mid-1930s.
Cornish matters. R.C. Riley. 220.
See letter from I.E. Herbert page 176: 0-6-0PTs Nos. 2181 and 2182 were at St. Blazey to work Goonbarrow branch: latter lasted until 1955.
Cornish matters. R.C. Ormiston-Chant.
See letter from I.E. Herbert page 176: Nos. 2181-2190 were equipped with larger brake cylinders for working four coach trains..
GWR 'nondescript' saloon. Mick Haynes.
See feature page 118: vehicle being restored at Bewdley was No. 9103..
GWR 'nondescript' saloon. B. Hillier.
See feature page 118 asked for reason for apparent oblique angle of signal shown on p. 118
Maiden Newton. R.N. Johnston.
See Preview Issue page 3: describes nature of signalling at Maiden Newton and how through trains to Bridport must have been worked..
GWR code words. J.W.P. Rowledge.
See Preview Issue paghe 45: code words Grove and Deepdene
Cover Photo [Issue No. 3]. A.C. Taylor.
See Issue 3 front cover: was Hall a substitute for Castle?
Castles in Wales. Des Williams.
See letter from Guy Williams on page 88: No. 4000 (rebuilt North Star) had a higher cab floor height: cites R.J. Roche drawing W/L/11..

Number 6 (Spring 1993)

Bath Road's 'Star' class 4-6-0 No. 4056 Princess Margaret, at Old Oak Common on Sunday, 23rd September 1956. R.C. Riley. front cover
Locomotive was in excellent external condition with number painted on buffer beam as well as BR smokebox number. 8F behind. Sadly weather not very good (it had been a very poor summer).

Jenkins, Stanley C. The Marlborough Branch. 222-41; 260-3.
Strange town, even stranger branch line: appropriate that author includes photographs of town taken on market day in 1937 from which there is no indication that the town had a railway station, or a major local industry: the public school which provided the town with excellent places to eat. The railways came, were rationalized and have departed: Jenkins concentrated on the first to arrive: the broad gauge Marlborough Railway, authorised on 22 July 1861 and opened to Savernake on 14 April 1864 where it connected with the Berks & Hants Extension Railway. On 21 July 1873 the Swindon, Marlborough & Andover Railway was authorised and eventually became the Midland & South Western Junction Railway which provided duplicate fascilities over most of the route, except where most needed, namely at Savernake, although such were provided from a date not provided herein. See also letter from Mike Barnsley in Number 16 page 708 on fascilities at Savernake. See Editorial correction on page 352 to caption for illus. on p. 260..

Copsey, John. Dean's 'Armstrong' Class 4-4-0s. 241-3.
Includes fairly rough reproduction of frame plan and elevation, Swindon general arrangement drawing No. 11221, December 1893, and illus. of No. 8 Gooch and No. 14 Charles Saunders. Constructed in 1894, nominal rebuilds of earlier locomotives: used mainly on London to Bristol services. Last survived until 1930. Mike Little (p. 352) notes that nameplates of Armstrong and Brunel are preserved privately and that Gooch is at the Didcot Railway Centre.

Harris, Peter. The Signal & Telegraph lineman. 244-6.
Experiences an unusual location, namely Patchway which included the twin single bore tunnels on the climb away from the Severn Tunnel. The electrical work involved what now appears to have been alchemy, namely the maintenance of zinc caustic soda cells with the aid of buckets of water and stirring in casutic soda in rural locations. Climbing telegraph poles using climbing irons. Describes trips on banking engines through the tunnels. Illus.: No. 5032 Usk Castle with pilot engine (Bulldog) coupled inside on North & West route train at Patchway with S&T hut visible (train of mainly GWR rolling stock included LNWR restaurant car), 1930s (G.H. Soole)..

Lewis, John. Modern GWR fish vans. 247-52.
Originally fish traffic was carried in six-wheel open wagons, but from 1909 vans were specially constructed for the conveyance of fish. The initial V13/S2 series were 16ft, but from 1912 21 ft (S6 type) were placed in service. Diagrams (side and end elevations). Part 2 see page 285.

Rance, Peter. The best location. 253-7.
The title was taken from a Great Western Railway publication which aimed to entice modern factories to sites adjacent to the Company's lines, notably at Southall, Slough and Park Royal. Another brochure Build Your Works on the GWR had a title suggested by Alan Whitehead. Based on material held by the Great Western Trust held at Didcot.

Strong, Paul (phot.). Cricklade Road Crossing. 258-9.
Two-page colour spread of No. 1658 on Highworth freight. Presumably motorcycle and sidecar belonged to photographer. February 1961.

Letters. 264
The '61XXs' Roy Williams.
See feature starting p. 178: fireman at Slough, claimed that class was capable of very high speed.
The '61XXs'. J.E. Norris.
See feature starting p. 178:. use of 61XX plus single autocar as replacement for diesel railcar working between Oxford and Hereford during period 1938/9.
Miscellaneous comments. Bob Crawley.
See illustration on p. 200: claims that semi-complete locomotive is in AE shop at Swindon of Lot 259 Nos. 5160-89; also illus. page 118 of non-descript saloons feature for bracket signal whish was sited obliquely to improve sighting..
Miscellaneous comments. Geoff Goslin
See feature starting p. 178:.queried why all the large Prairies were fitted with lever reverse in spite of clear evidence that 61XX were used on fast workings: reply from P.D. Hingley (p. 308) not very convincing, also feature page 211 on preparing 45XX at St Ives: queried  the economics of out-stationing locomotive at St Ives and employing a shedman on nightshift when it would have been cheaper to have kept the locomotive at Ponsadane..

Number 7 (Summer 1993)

45XX No. 5572 on Tavistock 'Motor' at Marsh Mills. R.C. Riley. front cover
29 August 1961

Paignton station. John Copsey. 266-74.
Railway reached Paignton in August 1859 as part of Dartmouth & Torbay Co.'s line from Torre to Kingswear. Was originally broad gauge, but converted to standard gauge during May 1892 conversion. Line was doubled from Torquay in 1909/10. New goods station opened in 1930/1 and line doubled to Goodrington. Platforms lengthened at passenger station and in 1935 plans for new station developed, but not implemented. Post-WW2 the station was very inadequate for traffic handled, but is now presumably ample for two-car DMUs. Further "visit" to Paignton Station in Number 39 page 363. Illus.:

Andover shed, GWR. Ron Hacker. 275-8.
Ex-MSWJR shed: in late 1930s five or six tender locomotives (Dukes, Earls, 43XX and 2251) and 45XX for Tidworth branch were allocated there.

The Exodus — Swindon Works 'Trip' holiday, 1912. Tim Bryan. 279-84.
12 July 1912: also includes notes on earlir, simpler operations, such as a trip to Oxford in the late 1840s organized by he Mechanics Institute. 1912 marked a major change as the West Country became an important destination with trains departing on Friday evening for overnight journeys. Penzance received over 1200 people. Weymouth was a popular destination. David Holmes (page 350) describes trips made on specials after his father had left the GWR service.

Modern GWR fish vans. Part 2. John Lewis. 285-93; 303-5..
Part 1 see page 247: covers 28ft 6in fish vans, known as BLOATER and BLOATER A, built between 1916 and 1919 to Diagram S8. Diagram S9 covered the next, and very similar series built between 1919 and 1920. These were originally dual brake-fitted (Westinghouse brake was removed between 1930 and 1935). Diagram S10 folowed in 1925/6 and had Ashe's ventilators from new. Diagram S11 covered fish vans ordered from Metropolitan Carriage Wagon & Finance Co. Due to a downturn in fish traffic many of these vans were used initially for passenger luggage in advance and then for general parcels traffic. The final design to Diagram S13 did not enter service until after Nationalization and were 31ft long, insulated six-wheelers. They were insulated with Onazote, a form of expanded natural rubber (a cellular material). Cooling was by Dry Ice. They were coded INSIXFISH, then INSUL-X-FISH. Fish traffic is considered: Milford Haven, Penzance and Brixham were the major points for dispatch and destinations included Glasgow and Aberdeen (presumably like coal for Newcastle). Letter from Keith Ettle (page 396) on differences in roofs and ventilators. See also letter from Albert Spooner (page 350) who noted how fish traffic from Milford Haven which arrived at Platform 7 at Paddington was quickly shifted to Platform 8. Also noted how 94XX classs No. 9422 was driven flat out from Friars Junction to Paddington Yard. .

GWR water tank. Swindon May 1878. No. 14964. 294.
Drawing of tank at Yeovil Pen Mill and possibly at Wells. Salisbury is crossed out on drawing.

Copsey, John, Riley, R.C. and Tipper, David. Locomotive liveries of the War and austerity years. 295-302.
The effects of austerity were far less than on mos of the other railways: Kings and Castle continued to be painted green, but without lining. Black without lining was applied to the remainder (and this included Saints and Stars). Lettering was reduced to "G [crest] W" for those in green and GWR for the remainder. Inevitably there were mix-ups: 5001 Llandovery Castle and No. 5018 St Mawes Castle may have joined Mallard in sombre black and there were black tenders coupled to some Castles. Following Peace lining and more green (for Stars, for instance) was gradually restored. The illus are interesting: 1027 County of Stafford in late summer, 1945, in lined green; tender of preserved 4003 Lode Star in Swindon stock shed on  16 June 1957 (colour: R.C. Riley); Saint No. 2980 Coeur de Lion (with GWR totem: shirt button monogram) at Hereford on 6 August 1939; tender of 100 A1 Lloyds (with totem); tender of 6008 King James II with GW and crest and lining at Leamington Spa in 1947; Hall No. 6959 without name or lining and GW and crest; No. 6990 Witherslack Hall (still lined green and with GW and crest) at Old Oak Common on 28 November 1954 (colour: R.C. Riley);  No. 5036 Lyonshall Castle in unlined green livery; same locomotive during WW2 on H class freight near Oxford; No. 2866 in black with GWR on tender; No. 5959 Mawley Hall in grunge, but with GW and crest just visible; 2021 No. 2060 in black livery lettered GWR at Swindon on 4 April 1946; and No. 2134 with Caerphilly "GWR" (unshaded block letters) at Danygraig on 7 July 1947;  Saint No. 2980 Coeur de Lion (with GW and crest) on 26 May 1947; 2301 class No. 2323 lettered GWR ex-Stafford Road Works on 23 January 1948 and No. 9710 still with with monogram (totem) on 18 March 1961 at Old Oak Common.

Yeovil Pen Mill. R.C. Riley (phot.). 307.
Two colour illus: overall panorama with BR DMU (with whiskers) on 7 July 1959 and 5996 Mytton Hall heading south on 10 July 1956 with train of GWR stock in attractive carmine & cream livery. Presumably both were Kodachrome I. Correction supplied on page 396 Swindon Works trip to Weymouth hauled by 6945 Glasfryn Hall

Letters. 308.
'61XXs'. S.C. Bromhall.
See illustration on page 200: argues that locomotive illsutrated was 61XX and questions why ATC gear was not fitted to original batch of this class and notes that the fully painted, but semi-complete nature of the locomotive is indicative of GWR painting methods.
'61XXs'. P.D. Hingley.
See letter by Goslin in 6 page 264 on lever reversers: suggests that screw reverse unsuitable for shunting: Goslin returned to this on page 350.
'61XXs'. Ron Hacker.
Noted how their Paddington to Weston-super-Mare train was "undertaken" by a 61XX hauled local near Twyford on down relief.
'61XXs'. Kenneth Brown.
61XX used in Cornwall whilst Penzance turnatble was being rebuilt in 1945. 6145 was used on Falmouth branch in 1943/4.
Maiden Newton. Peter Sqibb.
Replacement of lower quadrant signals by Southern Region upper quadrant signal bracket, with illus of offending foreigner

Number 8 (Autumn 1993)

'Hall' class 4-6-0 No. 6942 Eshton Hall on pilot duties at Ranelagh Bridge on Saturday, 10th September 1960. R.C. Riley. fron cover

Turner, Chris. Tiverton Junction between the Wars. 310-28.
Dairy produce was very important and its handling demanded great care: butter and cheese was forwarded from the Duchess of Devonshire Dairy, and from the R.S. Norrish & Sons Creamery at Sampford Peverell where staff were sent when required. Meat was forwarded from Lloyd Maunder's slaughterhouse. The Junction served the major branch line to Tiverton and beyond, and the Culm Valley line. The station was rebuilt in 1930-2 to enable main line trains to be looped.

Copsey, John. The train journal. 329.
Actual guard's journal which recorded a Welshpool to Aberystwyth stopping train journey made on the 16.35 on 27 September 1947. The lcomotive was 9002 and the rolling stock was recorded in detail. The arrival was punctual.

General arrangement drawing of first series of 57XX 0-6-0PT. 330-1; 336.
Swindon April 1928: side elevation and plan.

Copsey, John. '57XXs' at Reading. 332-8.
With the exception of a shared passenger working on the Henley branch, the bulk of the work performed by the 57XX class was shunting. In 1929 the 1076 class formed the backbone of the shunting stud at Reading, but these were gradually displaced by 57XX which were in effect a modernized version of the 2721 class. Very few other classes shared the work by WW2. Illus.: No. 7777 at head of long line of Pannier tanks outside Reading shed in 1946 (M.W. Earley); No. 3770 near Twyford on down freight on 20 November 1948 (J.F. Russell-Smith); No. 3783 on Reading shed on 26 March 1939; No. 5762 on Reading shed on 23 April 1950; No. 7777 on 23 Spril 19500 (noted that locomotive worked passenger services on Lambourn branch in mid-1950s; No. 9791 on 3 June 1950; No. 5766 with two former slip coaches between Wargrave and Twyford.

Tupper, Harold. An introduction to the work of the Goods Department. 339; 344-7.
The Chief Goods Managers were: Elias Ford (1924-1931); Alexander Maynard (1931-1942); F.W. Lampitt (1942-1946), and the last was David Blee. In 1930 there were still sixteen operating districts, but by 1934 the Manchester operation was closed and the traffic was handed over to the LMS. Only the largest freight centres had staff allocated directly to the Goods Department. Pooling with the LMS in the 1930s brought staff reductions. There were many transfer points with the other companies, notably at Banbury with the LNER. Acton and Bordesley were important transfer points: with teLMS in the case of the former, but with all the other companies via Acton. Transhipment was still practiced for small consignments. The Green Arrow service is mentioned. A coloured map dating from September 1933 is reproduced: this showed goods stations and country lorry centres (as at Redruth, for instance). ASlthough lines over which the GWR operated trains by running powers are shown distinctively, it is interesting to observe that Manchester reached both via Warrington and via Crewe/Stockport are shown as GWR routes..

Hyde, David. Marlborough High Level — a reflection. 340-1.
This station closed from 6 March 1933, in favour of the MSWJR station.

Shed scene: interior of Old Oak Common. R.C. Riley.
Colour photograph taken on 11 April 1964 with No. 4080 Powderham Castle; 6947 Helmingham Hall; 6937 Conyngham Hall and 47XX No. 4703.

Lewis, John. Royal Oak. 348-50.
Panorama dating from September 1930 looking towards Westbourne Park Villas with assorted wagons in foreground and non-corridor passenger coaches behind. Horse and sheeted cattle wagon No. 38801 with dual braking built in 1891 for use in passenger trains were cause of interesting correspondence from Tony Parkes on page 296 on handling horses properly.

Letters. 350; 352
Fish van workings. Albert Spooner.
See feature on page 285: noted how fish traffic from Milford Haven which arrived at Platform 7 at Paddington was quickly shunted to Platform 8, from which the empties were eventually drawn out to Old Oak Common, before removing the sleeping cars from Neyland from Platform 8. Also noted how 94XX classs No. 9422 was driven flat out from Friars Junction to Paddington Yard. .
Locomotive liveries. R.C. Ormiston-Chant.
Method of painting employed by Swindon where locomotives under contruction or repair were painted during erection. Boilers were usually painted prior to being sent to the erecting shop.
61XXs. N.E. Gardner.
No. 6116 retained its smaller (5ft 3in) driving wheels in period 1938-55 when writer was employed at Slough. It was not a popular engine, due to its increased coal and water consumption.
61XXs. G.W. Goslin.
See letter from P.D. Hingley on lever reverse on p. 308 which claimed that type was better for shunting, but writer argues that not built for this function.
Swindon Trip Holiday. David Holmes.
See feeature on the Swindon Trip on page 279. Although father had left railway service, writer enjoyed participating in Trip specials through membership of Boy Scouts: this included travel to Jersey on the St Patrick via Weymouth. But travel on a special for a cricket match at the Oval on a Trip special was not greeted with joy by the travelling ticket collector even though the writer possessed a normal return ticket.
'Armstrong' 4-4-0s. Mike Little. 352.
See page 241: notes that nameplates of Armstrong and Brunel are preserved privately and that Gooch is at the Didcot Railway Centre.
Royal Oak — a postscript. John Lewis.
See caption to illus on p. 248: more information about cattle truck
The Marlborough Branch (GWRJ. No. 6). Editor.
See article beginning p. 222: error to caption on page 260

Hirwaun station with auto train for Merthyr and Metro tank. G.N. Southerden (phot.). 352.
June 1936: locomotive has disc with "M AUTO 2" on it: auto trailer was ex-SRM  


Special Cornish Issue (late Summer 1992)

4549 leaving St Ives on 4 August 1961. P.W. Gray. front cover

The St. Ives branch. Stanley C. Jenkins. 3-34.
Construction of this, the last broad gauge line, started in 1874 and was completed in 1877. Col. Rich's Inspection Report is dated 16 May 1877 nd the line was opened on 1 june. Illus.: include St Ives as broad gauge; and c1900, Lelant as mixed gauge, 0-4-4T No. 34 shunting at St Ives, 4409 at St Ives in 1913; Metro 2-4-0T No. 1496 at St Erth on 28 June 1924; 4403 at St Erth on 9 August 1923; 4517 with Centenary stock TC off Cornish Riviera at St Ives (also shows GWR bus for Tregenna Castle Hotel) in late 1930s; 4554 arriving St Ives on 12 August 1936; Cornish Riviera awaiting departure from St Ives in 1950s; See also letters from: I.E. Herbert (page 176) who commented upon motive power observing that between 1938 and 1948 No. 4500 was virtually the permanent locomotive at St Ives; in theory No. 4407 was intended for the Hayle Wharf branch but frequently worked the Penzance St Ives turn. Wonders why 4575 series was banned from branch. Haulage of evacuees to St Ives (possibly by Nos 4500 and 4407); stopping of trains before descent into station; ticket collection at Carbis Bay as St Ives was an open station; traffic to Lelant; the B sets used on the branch. Roy Hart (letter page 176) commented on mixed gauge track from St Erth to Lelant, also working of mixed gauge freight trains; 45XX class was authorized from 1931; board at St Erth which indicated types permitted on branch; 90XX permitted from 1945; some errors in description of St Erth signal box, working the Porthia Clay Co's siding near St Erth; detailed notes on the nomenclature of signals at St Ives, length of loop at St Ives, and means adopted for single line working. .

Copsey, John. Cornish 'Halls' in the 1930s. 35-9.
Workings in Cornwall in 1925 by prototype 2925 included the Cornish Riviera, allocated to Penzance in 1927. Once the Hall class proper was introduced they were allocated to Penzance, Truro and Laira (for working into Cornwall) and were used for express trains. Load limits are quoted. Illus.: 4959 Purley Hall at Par on 5 August 1933 with stopping train for Penzance (P.J.T. Reed); Bulldog 3398 Montreal assisting 4983 Albert Hall at Par on Penzance express as previous (Hall also shown enlarged); Truro-based 4950 Patshull Hall at Plymouth North Road on 19 August 1934; 4976 Warfield Hall at Penzance mpd in early 1930s

'B sets' in Cornwall. John Lewis. 40-2.
Shows lines to which B sets were allocated in 1937/8 including Looe, Bodmin, Falmouth, Helston, Newquay and St Ives branches; and workings at that time (including those through to Wadebridge). There is also a summary of the variations in the B-set design. Illus. B set at Newquay on 26 August 1948 with coach W6161 visible.

Cornish china clay. Gerry Beale. 43-60.
Better than usual map. Illus. 4298 at Fowey in May 1950; Burngullow station in mid-1920s; 4585 at Grugwallins Sidings near Burngullow c1959; 57XX shunting wagons over weighbridge at Burngullow in July 1952; Metro 2-4-0T at St Blazey c1903 with passenger train for Newquay; page 48 (lower) 0-6-0STs 1364 and 1396 (ex-CMR) at St Blazey mpd on 24 October 1921; 4517 at St Blazey mpd with good view of semi-roundhouse in 1930s (W.A. Camwell); page 50: Melangoose Mill clay works on Retew branch letter from P. English (p. 176) suggests that caption is incorrect, especially direction towards Retew; St Dennis Junction on 4 June 1922; 4552 on Retew branch crossing road; Page 53 English China Clays wagons English (p. 176) identifies as Treviscoe sidings on St Dennis to Burngullow branch (area also known as Kernick); Roy Hart (letter page 176) was in agreement and noted that St Dennis to Burngullow section was closed for twenty years due to dispute over mineral rights at Carpella.; series of pictures worthty of Archive showing china clay wagons being tipped, jetties and ships at Fowey in 1920s (includes wagons owned by Toyne Carter & Co.); Fowey passenger station c1913 with two passenger trains and china clay loaded in casks in wagons including two Cornish Minerals Railway vehicles; 4206 entering St Blazey Yard c1959; 1664 with train of china clay approaching Middleway Bridge Crossing on 13 July 1961 (colour: Peter W. Gray); 5557 between Bodmin Road and Lostwithiel in mid-1950s.. See also letter from I.E. Herbert on page 176 who commented on failure to mention 2181 locomotives (2021 class rebuilt with extra braking); letter from P. English (p. 176) also stressed that coal was not carried in clay wagons. Roy Hart (letter page 176).

0-6-0PTs No.s 9755 and 1624 with china clay train from Drinnick Mill in 1961. P.W. Gray. rear cover.

2010-04-26

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