Irish locomotive development
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MGWR 4-4-0 129 Celtic designed Cusack (Rly Mag., 1902, 11, fp. 289)

This page still reflects the structure adopted in Steam locomotive development (which was not very good), but is being modified to accommodate the extra information provided via Clements and McMahon's Locomotives of the GSR. The railways of Ireland, and the majority of the steam locomotives which ran on them, were built when the whole country was part of the United Kingdom. Many British Chief Mechanical Engineers had been trained in Ireland or been Irish Locomotive Superintendents (e.g. J.A.F. Aspinall and R.E.L. Maunsell). Other CMEs or locomotive superintendents were trained in Great Britain and subsequently went to Ireland. Although the gauge is different (5 ft 3 in) a link, therefore, existed with British design. This was especially strong in Ulster on the Midland Railway, later LMS, owned Northern Counties Committee (NCC). Many "Irish" locomotives were constructed in "British" workshops, such as Beyer Peacock in Manchester, or at Derby works.

Almost inevitably the major administrative changes which took place in Great Britain were mirrored to an extent in Ireland. Thus the 1923 Grouping was followed by a railway grouping in the Republic of Ireland (Eire) in 1925 when the Great Southern Railways came into being.. This company was nationalized in 1945 to form part of the Coras Iompair Eireann (CIE). The LMS took over from the Midland Railway in Ulster, but in 1949 the Ulster Transport Authority (UTA) was created from the NCC system and the Belfast and County Down Railway.

Due to the newly-established frontier between Ulster and the Republic, certain railways remained independent from these groupings and three companies remained "free" until their end (the County Donegal Railways Joint Committee; the Sligo, Leitrim & Northern Counties Railway and the Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway). It should be noted that this last still exists as a bus company. The Great Northern Railway (Ireland) which links Dublin and Belfast was eventually divided between the CIE and UTA in 1958.

During the period surveyed by Jones there was little locomotive development in Ireland and this was due to the severe financial difficulties of the period following Partition. Prior to that locomotive development tended to mirror that in "Mainland" Britain: thus, the Dublin and Kingstown Railway, the first Irish railway, used locomotives very similar to those used on the Liverpool & Manchester Railway. This parallelism makes any work, such as the fatally flawed Oxford Companion to British Railway history, absurd in its titular claim (English railway history might have been acceptable).

During the Second World War the Republic suffered from a severe coal shortage and this, plus the poor condition of the locomotive stock, hastened the process of dieselisation. Steam was retained for longer in Northern Ireland, due to the better condition of the locomotives and to Stormont's doubts about the viability of railways as such. Ireland both North (where a delightfully inappropriately named, but able, engineer named Pope held sway) and South contributed much to diesel railcar development which is the normal form of traction over great swathes of the crumbling railway notwork in mainland Britain.

The material assembled in this section has been abstracted from non-Irish sources, in the main. The Journal of the Irish Railway Record Society did not appear to be publicly available (it was not in the British Museum and was not available through the National Central Library or the Irish Central Library). A sample issue was examined for Steam locomotive development and, to judge from the contents of that one part, it was a serious omission from the point of view of retrospective material. KPJ would be very obliged to receive details of material not included. The Irish Railway Record Society has a lively website, but is mainly concerned with contemporary activity. The Irish Railway Preservation Society also has a website. Returning to traditional sources, United Kingdom-based journals did survey contemporary development  in Ireland, and did offer some retrospective literature, especially the Locomotive, Railway Carriage & Wagon Review..

The Irish railways are surveyed in the following order:

  1. General literature
  2. Dublin & South Eastern Railway
  3. Great Southern Railways & its constituents, the importance of Inchicore
  4. Waterford Limerick [and Western] Railway
  5. Midland Great Western Railway
  6. Coras Iompair Eireann
  7. Great Northern Railway (Ireland)
  8. Northern Counties Committee & its constituents
  9. Belfast & County Down Railway
  10. Other Irish railways including
    1. Cork Bandon and South Coast
    2. Waterford & Tramore Railway

This is very different to the order adopted in Jones and reflects the greater period to be covered eventually

General literature: J.C. Conroy's scholarly A history of railways, in Ireland does not examine mechanical development.  The final volume in the magnificent Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain became magisterial once it extended its coverage to Ireland with a well-received work by J.W.P. Rowledge. The only books which had treated Irish locomotives as one unit by 1968/9 were R.N. Clements' and J.M. Robbins' The ABC of Irish locomotives and W.E. Shepherd's Twentieth century Irish locomotives. The former is unlike the remainder of the Ian Allan "ABC" series in that it includes notes on both the railways and the locomotives, in addition to tabulated data. The latter is similar in style and seems to be based on the earlier work, but incorporates more detail. Since then Rowledge has contributed a monumental survey of all steam locomotives in Ireland, Nock has written a better than usual book on Irish locomotive development: it is probably better in that it was a one-off.

Ahrons, E.L. Locomotive and train working in the latter part of the nineteenth century; edited by L.L. Asher. Cambridge: Heffer, 1951-4. Volume 6 includes Irish railways
Originally published in Railway Magazine 1925/6
Clements, R.N. and Robbins, J.M. The ABC of Irish locomotives. London, Ian Allan, 1949. 56 p. incl.. 16 plates. 46 illus., 19 tables, map.
Conroy, J.C. A history of railways in Ireland. London, Longmans, 1928. [viii], 386 p. 16 tables. Bibliog. (footnotes).
Originally compiled as a Thesis for the M.A. Degree at University College, Dublin.
Doyle, Oliver and Stephen Hirsch. Railways in Ireland, 1834-1984. Dublin: Signal, 1983. 204pp.
Published to celebrate 150 year anniversary of Dublin & Kingstown Railway.
Fayle, H. Dublin surburban services. Rly Mag., 1954, 100, 297-304. 6 illus.
Includes notes on the motive power.
Fayle, H. The Irish railways during the War. J. Stephenson Loco. Soc., 1946, 22, 59-70.
WW2: the effects of fuel shortages are emphasized.
Fayle, H. The narrow gauge railways of Ireland, London, Richard Tilling Ltd., 1946. 204 p. incl. 60 plates + 3 folding plates. 206 illus., (incl. 8 line drawings :s. el.),diagr., 3 tables, 15 maps.
Each narrow gauge (mainly 3 ft 0 in) line is treated separately
Ferris, Tom. Irish railways in colour: from steam to diesel, 1955-1957. Leicester: Midland Publishing, 1992. 120pp
Needless to say a gift to the impoverished Norfolk County "Library": copy seen very poorly printed..

Irish locomotive notes. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1930, 36, 178; 250.
Irish locomqtives in 1932. Rly Mag., 1933, 73, 458.
In connection with this Railway Magazine reference it should be noted that the May issues of this journal tended to specialize on Irish affairs.
Irish notes. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1938, 44, 387-8: 1939, 45, 10-11; 41-2; 83-4; 122-3; 149-50. 16 illus., diagr. (s. & f. els.)
Irish railway events, 1947. J. Stephenson Loco. Soc., 1948, 24, 120-3.
Irish railways locomotive notes. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1930, 36, 106.
Johnston, Norman. Locomotives of the GNR(I). Newtownards: Colourpoint, 1999, 208pp.
Not entirely error-free: Hawthorn Leslie with an additional "e" to the Hawthorn. In the Introduction notes his debt to R.N. Clements. Covers much more than the Great Northern.
Kidner, R.W. The light railway handbook . Part 4. Narrow gauge railways of Ireland.
McCormick, W.P. The railways of Northern Ireland and their locomotives. [Belfast, Author] 2nd ed. [1946] . 30 p. 13 illus., table.
Brief notes.
Middlemass, Thomas. Encyclopaedia of narrow gauge railways in Great Britain and Ireland. London: Guild, 1991. 272pp.
Includes most Irish narrow gauge lines (the majority of which were built to a common 3ft gauge).
Nock, O.S. Irish steam. a twenty year survey 1920-1939. 1982.
Reed, K.H. Notes on Irish locomotives. Rly Mag., 1929, 65, 302-5.
Rolt, L.T.C. and Whitehouse, P.B. Lines of character. London, Constable, 1952. [iv], 188 p. + front. + 32 plates. 65 illus. Bibliog
This contains the memorable account of the running of the cattle trains on the Tralee & Dingle Railway.
Rowledge, J.W.P. The Irish steam loco. register. Stockport: Irish Traction Group, 1993.
This book is extremely short of navigational aids: thus the Dublin & Kingstown Railway (a British and Irish landmark) is treated on page 86, but the contents listing (there is no index) places the user no nearer than somewhere between page 57 and 115. Once the Irish page is complete this deficiency will be rectified.
Shepherd, W.E. Twentieth century Irish locomotives. [Union Publications, 1969] , 61 p. 23 illus., table.
Whitehouse, P.B. A Northern Ireland miscellany, 1949. Rly Mag., 1950, 96, 340-2; 316-17. 7 illus.
Accent on the narrow gauge lines.
Young, R.A. A railway holiday in Ireland. Rly Mag., 1959, 105, 342-7; 416-20.9 illus.

Dublin & Kingstown Railway

The Dublin & Kingstown Railway was one of the earliest British railways and followed from the construction of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway (and another reason to reject Simmons' absurd paradigm as exemplified in the flawed Oxford Companion). Its earliest locomotives were built by Forrester & Co of Liverpool and included the first tank locomotives which Balkwill claims were Victoria and Comet in 1835.

Dublin & Kingstown Railway: centenary of Irish locomotive building. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1941, 47, 133-4.
Lowe, James W. British steam locomotive builders. 1975. 
Sekon's Evolution of the steam locomotive notes that three similar locomotives to the Experiment were constructed for the Dublin & Kingstown Railway in 1833. These early products suffered from steam leakage from the vertical cylinders and these were subsequently abandoned. Excellent source of information. Notes that 2-2-2WT Princess was first tank engine. Ten locomotives constructed at Grand Canal Street Works tabulated. Information on Locomotive Superintendents.

Narrow gauge lines (absorbed into Great Southern Railways/CIE)

Chapter 8 of Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR covers all the GSR narrow gauge lines and their locomotives, many of which were switched between lines, notably to the Cavan & Leitrim where coal traffic was strategically important. Fayle's Narrow gauge railways of Ireland describes all the lines considered in this section and it is, therefore, mentioned first. All shared the 3 ft 0 in gauge and the GSR and CIE adopted the policy of transferring locomotives from one section to another. All lines were lightly built and all are now closed, although a few tourist lines use some of the preserved locomotives. Steep gradients, sharp curvature and roadside tramway sections were other common features. W.J.K. Davies' Light railways opens his Chapter 4 entitled Ireland with "Ireland, unlike the rest of the British Isles, presents the case of a true network of secondary railways – but, alas, a network of lines badly mismanaged, both by the state authorities and by the individual company promoters..

Fayle, H. The narrow gauge railways of Ireland. London, Richard Tilling Ltd., 1946. 204 p. incl.. 60 plates + 3 folding plates. 206 illus. (incl. 8 line drawings s. els.), diagr., 2 tables, 15 maps.

Cavan & Leitrim Railway
Opened on 24 October 1887 according to Middlemass. It connected Dromod on the Mullingar to Sligo line with Belturbet, the terminus of the GNR(I) branch from Ballyhaise on the Clones to Cavan section. There was a branch from Ballinamore to Arigna (known as the Tramway) and an extension thence to the coal mines at Derreenavoggy. Its main traffic, coal from the mines at Agrigna, gave it a longer life and the line tended to gather locomotives from other sections as they closed beginning with the Cork, Blackrock & Passage 2-4-2Ts and ending with ex-Tralee & Dingle 2-6-2Ts. Its own locomotives are listed in the following table (all were supplied by R. Stephenson: all were 4-4-0T except for No. 9 (0-6-4T): al were given suffix L by GSR.Nos. 1-8 rebuilt with larger boilers: 1902-6..

No. Name WN/date Withdrawn
1 Isabel 2612/1887 1949
2 Kathleen 2613/1887 1959 preserved
3 Lady Edith 2614/1887 1959 preserved
4 Violet 2615/1887 1959
5 Gertrude 2616/1887 1925
6 May 2617/1887 1927
7 Olive 2618/1887 1945
8 Queen Victoria 2619/1887 1959 name removed in 1921
9 King Edward 3136/1904 1934

Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR pp. 211-15 cite the major dimensions for Nos. 1 to 8: 3ft 6in coupled wheels, 14 x 20in cylinders, 9ft2 grate area and a total heating surface of 588ft2. Boilers operated at 150 psi. Locomotives 1 to 8 were classified as 1L or Inchicore DN2. By June 1924 the average mileage of Nos. 1-4 was 500,000, and Nos. 5-8 300,000. They operated without brick arches until 1925 as it was considered that they steamed better without them, but brick arches were then fitted. Nos. 5 to 8 were fitted with encased motion for operating on the tramway until 1924: No. 7 Olive is shown working with encased motion and large headlamp. No. 9 was Robert Stephenson WN 3136/1904: it had 3ft 3in coupled wheels, 15 x 20in cylinders, 14ft2 grate area and a total heating surface of 747ft2. It was classified as 9L or HN1. Although it was designed to cope with two chain curaves, had flangeless trailing coupled wheels, it had a higher maximum axleload (11.25 tons) and track damage (especially between 1916 and 1918) was severe and eventually limited its operation. It was withdrawn in 1934.

Contemporary.
New tank locomotive, Cavan and Leitrim Railway. Locomotive Mag., 1905, 11, 125, illus.
3ft gauge 0-6-4T designed to be capable of hauling 120 tons on gradient of in 1 in 30 at 12 mph. 7ft 5in coupled wheelbase.. Cylinders 15in x 10in. 3ft 3in coupled wheels.746.5ft2 total heating surface 14ft2  grate area. 150 psi boiler pressure. Walschaerts valve gear. T.S. Shamks locomotive superintendent. No. 9 King Edward..

The Cavan and Leitrim Railway and its locomotives. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1936, 42, 249-52. 6 illus.
Flanagan, P.J. The Cavan & Leitrim Railway. Newton Abbot (Devon), David & Charles, 1966. 192 p. + col. front. + 24 plates. 67 illus., 8 diagrs., 7 tables, 11 plans. 3 maps. Bibliog.
The motive power is described in depth. Locomotives introduced from other sections are also included.
Kirkland, R.K. The Cavan & Leitrim Railway. Rly Mag., 1951, 97, 339-45. 4 illus., table. map.
A table includes all locomotives which worked on the railway.
Smith, W.A.C. The end of the Cavan & Leitrim. Trains ill., 1959, 12, 412-15. 6 illus.

Cork & Muskerry Light Railway
Incorporated on 12 December 1883. Opened to Blarney Castle on 8 August 1887. Boyd's Schull & Skibbereen Railway gives brief details of both the line and the locomotives one of which was transferred by the GSR to the Schull & Skibbereen when the Cork system closed completely from 29 December 1934: the line had suffered competition from Cork City Tramway's electric trams and terminally from motor buses.. There were branches to Coacchford and from St Anne's to Donoughmore (opened in 1893). The line achieved notoriety when there was a violent collision between a train and a steam roller in Cork on 6 September 1927.. Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR pp. 215-20  give slightly more information on the line and considerably more on the locomotives. The Cork & Muskerry were attractive narrow gauge lines in the vicinity of Cork City that had opened in August 1887: their environs were the leafy lanes and pleasant valleys west of the city were in complete contrast to the S&SR and its trains began their journey westwards from the city by passing along the street.

2-4-0T/4-4-0T
GSR Class 1k: Inchicore Class DN6

Nos. 1-3 City of Cork, Coachford and St. Annes were built by Hughes at the Falcon Railway Plant (WN137/136/138) in 1887. They were rebuilt as 4-4-0Ts in about 1889. The first two were withdrawn in 1938, and No. 3 in 1924. They had 3ft 6in coupled wheels, 11½ x 18in cylinders, 8.25ft2 grate area, and a total heating surface of 472ft2. Boiler pressure was 140 psi.They were unusual in employing Joy valve gear.. Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR page. 216. No. 4 was a Kitson 2-4-0WT named Blarney (WN 235/1888). It was withdrawn in 1911.

0-4-4T
GSR Class 5k (later 6s): Inchicore Class EN1
The fifth and sixth engines supplied to the C&MLR, were unusual in being of the 0-4-4 wheel arrangement – the only narrow-gauge examples in Ireland. They were bought to work the Donoughmore Extension Railway, opened on 6 May 1893, a nominally independent section which served a thinly-populated valley north-west of Cork. Delivered in 1892 and 1893 respectively from Thomas Green & Son of Leeds: they were WN 180/1892 Donoughmore running No.5 and WN . 200/1893 The Muskerry (later simply Muskerry) running No.6. As built, they had stove-pipe chimneys. In 1925 they became Nos. 5k and 6k (Class EN1) under the GSR which took them into Inchicore Works when the line closed. Here they were dismantled and stored. Later No.5 was re-assembled and numbered 9t for employment on the Tralee & Dingle section but was never transferred to Tralee. No.6 was similarly treated for service on the S&S section as 6s but it had to return to Inchicore again shortly afterwards as the buffer beams fouled Ballydehob platform and the goods and cattle docks there and at the termini: also for alterations to the brake hose connection. After this it did sterling work. Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR page. 217.

Dimensions were: cylinders 14 x 20 in., driving wheels 3 ft 6 in. diameter (somewhat large for the gradients of the S&S section), bogie wheel diameter 2 ft 0 in., coupled wheelbase 6 ft 0 in., total wheelbase 14 ft 10 in; grate area 10.5ft2, total heating surface 600 ft2, boiler pressure 140 psi, water capacity 500 gallons, coal capacity 1 ton, weight in working order 25 tons; tractive effort 11,100 lbf.

4-4-0T
Further 4-4-0Ts were supplied by Brush Electrical (successors to Hughes) and by Hunslet. See. Middlemass. and especially Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR pp. 218-20. who record that each of these locomotives received its own Inchicore classification:
DN3 7 Peake Brush Electrical WN 274/1898 (see also Sekon p. 324): 4ft coupled wheels, 14 x 22in cylinders, 10.5ft2 grate area and ths of 646ft2 Boiler pressure 140 psi. Withdrawn 1935.
DN7 8 Dripsey Brush Electrical WN 307/1904: 4ft coupled wheels, 12 x 18in cylinders, 10.5ft2 grate area and ths of 646ft2. Boiler pressure 140 psi.Withdrawn 1935. 
DN1 4 Blarney  Hunslet  WN 1200/1919: 3 ft 6 in. coupled wheels, 13 x 20in cylinders, 8.25ft2 grate area and ths of 467ft2. Boiler pressure 160 psi.Withdrawn 1927 after a very short life.

Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway:
This railway closed in 1932, but four of the locomotives were transferred to the Cavan & Leitrim. It opened on 8 June 1850 as a 5ft 3in gauge line, but was converted to 3ft gauge in 1900 when it was extended to Crosshaven .According to Clements and McMahon. pp. 214-15 the line was highly unusual for thge Irish narrow gauge in having a double track section between Cork and Blackrock, but this was sigled in 1927.Its primary traffic was suburban. The original (broad gauge) loocomotives were supplied by Sharp Bros in 1850 and were all 2-2-2Ts: WN 655, 656 and 662. The narrow gauge locomotives were Neilson 2-4-2Ts: WN 5561-4/1899: RN 4 to 7 which were suffixed P whilst at Cork, but the numbers were changed to 10L to 13L on the Cavan & Leitrim. No. 11L was withdrawn in 1936; No. 13L in 1954 and the remaining two in 1959.. According to Middlemass "they could run like hares". They were classified as 4P later 10L and Inchicore FN1. They had 4ft 6in coupled wheels, 14½ x 22in cylinders, 12ft2 grate areas and a total heating surface of 801ft2. On the CLR they were restricted to the main line and were not permitted on the Agrigna branch..

NARROW gauge locomotives (No. 5): 2-4-2T, No. 5, Cork, Blackrock & Passage Railway (later Cavan & Leitrim Railway, No. 11). Railways, 1944, 5, 122-3. 4 illus., (incl.. line drawing : s. f. & r. els.)

Schull & Skibbereen Light Railway
Boyd gives a very extensive account of the locomotives used on this railway. The line began as the West Carberry Tramway & Light Railway. Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR pp. 221-3 portray the locomotives during the decline of the line and quote the major dimensions of the locomotives in GSR days.

Boyd, James I.C. The Schull & Skibbereen Railway. 1999. (Oakwood Library of Railway History No. 108)
Fayle, H
. and Camwell, W.A. Round Roaring Water Bay : the Schull & Skibbereen Light Railway. Rly Mag., 1940, 86, 257-62 +. 10 illus., map.
Newham, A.T. The Schull and Skibbereen Tramway and Light Railway. (Locomotion papers, No. 24).
Originally presented as a lecture to the Irish Railway Record Society.
Schull and Skibbereen Light Railway. Locomotive Mag., 1906, 12, 150-1. 3 illus.
3ft gauge. 15¼ miles long laid on flat bottom rail. Formerly known as West Carberry Light Railway & Tramway. Passing place at Ballydehob. Severe gradients (1 in 24) and sharp curves (2 chains). Two mixed trains per day with a journey time of 1 hour 20 minutes. Six carriages and four locomotives. Three tramway locomotives were supplied by Dick Kerr in 1886: 0-4-0T with 9½ x 16in cylinders and 2ft 6in coupled wheels: 1 Marion: 2 Ida: 3 Ilen
No. 1 had been reboilered with a dome, but was out-of-service. Ida had been rebuilt with a Belpaire boiler (illustrated). No. 4 Erin was supplied by Nasmyth Wilson in 1888. It was a 4-4-0T with Belpaire boiler, 12 x 18in cylinders, 3ft 4in coupled wheels, and 508ft2 total heating surface. It was probably the first Irish locomotive with a Belpaire boiler. New No. 1 Gabriel had been supplied by Peckett (illustrtared). It was a 4-4-0T with the wheels inside the frames, 12 x 18in cylinders and 3ft 0½in coupled wheels.

Boyd (above) Chapter Fourteen Locomotives: Early three-foot gauge tramways in Ireland using steam locomotives
Boyd began by dispelling any notion that the West Carbery was a pioneer steam tramway in Ireland by tabulating its contemporaries.

Title

Length

Opened

Engine builder

Dublin & Lucan Tramway

6/1881

Kitson & Co., Leeds

Portstewart Tramway

6/1882

Kitson & Co., Leeds

Giant's Causeway...

½*

1/1883

W. Wilkinson & Co. Ltd, Wigan

Castlederg & Victoria Bridge Tramway

7/1884

Kitson & Co., Leeds

* Only this short distance from Portrush station was worked by steam.

Boyd noted that none of the above four undertakings approached the WCT for length (although the Castlederg line was half of  it KPJ), that none used Dick, Kerr-built locomotives, and that the operation and costs of each were available to the promoters of the WCT before construction started. In a period when steam tramway building was in vogue, perhaps established builders like Kitson and Wilkinson had full order books? Perhaps Dick, Kerr were anxious to break into the market and quoted a competitive price? Boyd stated that these questions remain unanswered: it was obviously the last (KPJ).

0-4-0T (tramway locomotives) GSR Class MN1
Three 0-4-0 tram engiines were supplied by Dick Kerr in 1886 (in Chapter being cited Boyd states "1888"): all had 2ft 6in diameter coupled wheels and 9½ x 16in cylinders. They were named: Marion, Ida and Ilen (Boyd used upper case for the names). Boyd conjectures the steps that led to the conception of the West Carbery in the form of a street tramway, though neither its length, gradients nor curves would be inadmissible as these features were frequently found in the towns of the West Riding (e.g. Huddersfield), but seldom of the severity and continuation of the WCT which soon proved the street tram principle was unsuited to the terrain.

Faults included the boiler/firebox design; the firebox brick-arches were faulty, and the three were recommended for rebuilding with copper in place of steel. The wrong material led to weeping of the boiler/firebox due to unequal expansion of these materials. The weight in working order was 15 tons but they were unable to pull twice their weight on a gradient of 1 in 30. Some of the blame was placed on the firemen who were possibly inexperienced. Sheet-steel skirting was taken down to a level approximately 3 in. above the rails; the rolling and pitching of the engine probably produced shrieks of protest as it scraped the rails. There was an entrance through the upper sheeting both front and rear; the former would allow the tubes to be cleaned. With a coupled wheelbase of only 6 ft, the fore and aft pitching was considerable. Well tanks held 350 gallons. Condensing of the live steam was also a problem as the boilers were domeless. The engines were delivered in a green livery. Marion and Ida were possibly named after Director's wives; Ilen is the river at Skibbereen.
The locomotives failed from the first; shortage of steam was countered by the early removal of the condensing gear, and the disconnection of the vacuum brake. Leakages of both boiler and firebox were put down to cost-cutting and the use of steel in construction. Unequal expansion would cause leakage. The Company submitted, clearly with informed opinion, that the fireboxes were wrongly made and detailed leaking tubes, and cracks around the firehole door. To remedy a dire situation, the cure was seen in fitting new fireboxes to the tram engines and then putting them on light duties; they would then be replaced by conventional engines of adequate power output. Though this objective was to be achieved over a number of years, the initial financial position forbade it, but a start was made in 1888..
Marion was in a dismantled state at Skibbereen in 1906. Ida when seen at Skibbereen in 1924 was largely unused except in emergency. Ida had been rebuilt in 1905 when it lost its tram-engine appearance. A more conventional cab was fitted having an open back; the side sheets were given a horizontal shutter which would close to keep out a little of the Atlantic gales. In May 1901 a new, bigger boiler had been ordered from Nasmyth, Wilson which cost £403: it was fitted  with a Belpaire firebox and a huge dome on its first ring, surmounted by Salter safety valves. A very tall chimney was to aid combustion. A large brass lubricator was mounted below the chimney. In this state the engine could produce a tractive effort of 5,730 lbf with 140psi boiler pressure. Further modifications were made before 1924, when the locomotive had a smokebox extension necessitating a removal of the forward sandboxes so they were now outside the sheeting at both ends – as when new. The machine lasted until the GSR take-over in 1925 but was not taken into stock; it was scrapped in 1926, although according to Clements and McMahon it received an Inchicore classification. They note as received into the GSR it had 2ft 6in coupled wheels and 9½in x 16in cylinders..

4-4-0T Erin
Supplied by Nasmyth, Wilson (WN either 341 or 342/1888) and funded by a loan of £1,600. As delivered, the vacuum brake was omitted, and the bogie had disc wheels with splashers on the rear set. The livery was green with white lining, and lettering on the side tank stated WEST CARBERY TRAMWAY with ERIN painted below but no number. It was a sound purchase and proved itself by outlasting the railway. It received a replacement boiler from Peckett in March 1908 costing £428 and pressed to 150psi. It had 'pop' safety valves, and the dome had been heightened to accommodate a higher intake to the main steampipe and supply hotter steam to the injector. Replacement disc wheels were fitted and in 1909 an extended coal bunker was cantilevered out behind the cab as the capacity within was inadequate. The side opening to the cab was partly infilled with sheeting. A Belpaire firebox was fitted from new and was probably the first of its type in Ireland (Clements and McMahon claim first in British Isles), whilst the Walschaerts valve gear was a further novel feature. According to Clements and McMahon (page 222) it weighed 24 tons, had a total heating surface of 509ft2, 9ft2 grate area and 12 x 18in cylinders.

As built, only one injector was fitted, together with a crosshead-driven pump on the right-hand side. The evidence of the higher dome suggests that the steep gradients induced priming and modification was necessary to correct it; the original coal capacity was clearly too meagre for an engine required by the line's nature to consume more than average amounts of fuel.

A second injector was fitted later under the fireman's (left side) and fed a clack forward of the tank on that side. The dome-stearn-supplied injector on the right-hand tank top fed a clack on that side and was unusual in being controlled from the driver's side. In view of what footplatemen recalled of conditions, this was a wise precaution as the fireman was so constantly feeding the fire and keeping a look-out that water-levels and injector controls could take second-place. Duplication was essential. Except when in Skibbereen for repairs the engine was normally based at Schull and therefore became the regular duty engine; it was preferred to the Peckett-built engines which joined it later; the accessibility of the motion was a factor and the ride better with its longer driving wheelbase. In 1925 it acquired tank-side number plates bearing the number 4s surmounted by small characters GSR; the suffix 's' to the number indicated S&SR section under the GSR (which classified it DN5, the only member of the class).

4-4-0T No. 1 Gabriel
Peckett WN 1085/1906 was acquired to replace Marion, a tender for £1,220 being accepted for a second 4-4-0T. Unlike No.4 Erin which had inside frames, Gabriel was outside-framed. The driving wheel diameter was reduced to 3 ft 0½in giving more tractive effort, the bogie wheels increased to 2 ft 0 in. diameter, the driving wheelbase brought down to 5 ft 0 in., bogie wheelbase 4 ft 0 in. (total wheelbase 15 ft). Boiler pressure was increased to 160psi and with cylinders the same size as No.4 and smaller driving wheels, the tractive effort was enhanced to 9,650 lbf. Coal capacity was 1¼ tons and weight in working order 26½ tons which made for better adhesion. The grate area was 8 ft2 and total heating surface 575 ft2 . The men liked her. Peckett's were proud of their creation and their contemporary catalogue featured an embossed representation of the engine on the cover.
In 1906 on the first arrival of the, engine at Schull, it was turned and re-attached to the train, and was then blessed by Father John O'Connor, the Parish Priest of Schull who mounted the leading footplate, broke a bottle of champagne over the smokebox and duly named the engine.
It will be noted that on both this engine and its predecessor, ERIN, the cowcatcher was on the front end only. GABRIEL carried a wooden tool box and re-railing jack at the front end - or was the former for sand, as the front and rear sanding pipes so visible when new, are missing on later photographs? Furthermore, scrutiny of the maker's photograph shows only a leading sandbox below the footplate; the rear must be below the floor of the cab? Locally made rear sandboxes outside the frames appear more recently. Note too the usual Peckett displacement lubricator on the back of the chimney and the prominent compensating lever between the main driving springs. The weary looking lamp which drooped at the foot of the chimney appears to be of carbide type; it would not give much illumination but would be a better warning than an oil one. It was carried on two brackets, shaped like a 'U'; the engine lamps were of conventional pattern.
The engine was classed 'DN4' by the GSR but exceptionally, the nameplates were not removed as was their custom, 'No. l' being painted in small characters on the front beam instead, though the listed number was 1s. This, and the engines surviving to be absorbed in the GSR, were painted an un-lined black. The boiler, which had never received pop safety valves, was beyond repair in 1936 and the engine was scrapped in 1937. Its cylinders became a 'transplant' onto No.3. GABRIEL had proved itself to be prudent purchase. Its only major catastrophe occurred in Spring 1909 when the driving axle fractured; Peckett supplied a new one at half-price, having considered its age.

4-4-0T No.3 Conciliation (Kent).
Purchased in 1914, this was another machine from Peckett (WN 1356/1914) which proved to be of equally good value. It was almost identical to Gabriel, and under the GSR was given No.3 to replace the tram engine Ilen scrapped at that time. The name Kent had been bestowed in place of the original through local patriotism. The Skibbereen fitter, Paddy Murphy, who had been moved by the execution of Thomas Kent in Cork gaol by the British in 1916, contrived to make a new pair of plates from brass boiler tube and placed them before the Management Committee. This body was sympathic to such a patriotic gesture, acceded to the request, and No.3 was re-christened accordingly. Boyd describes at length the local politics which conspired in the renaming.
As this acquisition was a little shorter than Gabriel (24 ft 11 in.), it had a reduced heating surface at 514 ft2, grate area of 7.58 ft2, a coal capacity of 18 cwt. and weight in working order of 25½ tons (or possibly one ton less).# Painting, etc. was similar to Is under the GSR and the engine outlasted the life of the railway. Under the GSR, the engine was classed DN4.

Ex-Cork & Muskerry 0-4-4T No. 6s
The main account of this locomotive is included with the Muskerry line. 6s had to return to Inchicore shortly after arrival as the buffer beams fouled Ballydehob platform and the goods and cattle docks there and at the termini: also for alterations to the brake hose connection. After this it did sterling work.

It was the most powerful engine to work on the system so that at least those larger driving wheels would be offset on the steeper sections - the C&MLR had nothing of this nature to contend with. When working the Donoughmore line, Nos. 5 & 6 were usually turned at the end of each journey so that the cab was leading. The cowcatcher was at the front end for working the S&S section, whereas on the C&M Nos. 5 & 6 might sport the fitting at one end or the other!

Unique for the S&S line, it was driven from the left side which was likely to have been unpopular with most firemen. The bunker itself was pathetically small as built but Inchicore provided a new one of greater capacity - the increased height was noticeable.

As regards the vacuum brake, it may be noticed that No. 6s had two brake hoses at the bunker end and a single hose at the front. The double hoses were found necessary because the original single hose would not reach the train hoses when traversing a sharp curve. To make matters worse, there was a swing at the bunker end, a drawback which the other locomotives did not have. On No. 6s the bunker was always next to the train with chimney leading. To overcome this, when the engine returned to Inchicore to have the buffer beams 'trimmed', double hoses were fitted to the bunker.

Tralee & Dingle Light Railway
The railway opened in 1898 and had a main line of 32¼ miles plus a 6 mile branch to Castlegregory. This railway accumulated a rich literature: Tom Rolt's account in Lines of character is amongst the best pieces of writing about railways. Patterson's Clogher Valley Railway (p. 94) noted that the railway experimented with the Holden system of oil-firing as the Clogher's Locomotive Superintendent was sent to Tralee to inspect the system. Middlemass lists locomotives supplied: all except No. 7 and 8 (original) supplied by Hunslet (H): Nos. 7-8 by Kerr Stuart (K). All received suffix T to numbers under GSR, except No. 4.Clements and McMahon Locomotives of the GSR  (pp. 224-6) quote different withdrawal dates and these have been added to the table below in parenetheses and this is followed by the main dimensions listed by them.:.

No. Type WN/date withdrawn GSR class Inchicore class Notes
1 2-6-0T 477/1889 H 1953 (1954) 1T KN2
2 2-6-0T 478/1889 H 1953 (1954) 1T KN2
3 2-6-0T 479/1889 H 1959 1T KN2 transferred Cavan & Leitrim
4 0-4-2T 514/1890 H 1908
4 (originally 8) 2-6-0T 836/1903 K 1959 4T KN1 transferred Cavan & Leitrim
5 2-6-2T 555/1892 H P 5T PN2 transferred Cavan & Leitrim: preserved at Tralee
6 2-6-0T 677/1898 H 1960 1T KN2 transferred West Clare thence to Cavan & Leitrim
7 2-6-0T 800/1902 K 1928 4T KN1
8 2-6-0T 1051/1910 H 1955 1T KN2 transferred West Clare

Hunslet 2-6-0T locomotives: these were fitted with Walschaerts valve gear and had flangeless centre coupled (3ft 0½in) wheels; 13 x 18in cylinders; 150 psi boilers with a total heating surface of 560ft2 and a grate area of 9.75ft2.
Hunslet 2-6-2T locomotive: this was the first inside frame narrow gauge locomotive in the British Isles accoring to Clements and McMahon.. It was supplied with Holden oil burning equipment, but converted to coal in 1893. It was used to burn turf (peat) in 1944. It received a major overhaul in 1959. It has/had 3ft 0½in coupled wheels, 13½ x 18in cylinders, a 150 psi boiler with a total heating surface of 601ft2 and a grate area of 10.7ft2.
Kerr Stuart 2-6-0T locomotives: they had 3ft 0in coupled wheels, 12½ x 20in cylinders, 140 psi boilers with a total heating surface of 478ft2 and a grate area of 7.5ft2. No. 4 had been modified in 1908 with larger cylinders (13½ diameter) and higher (160 psi) boiler pressure. Somewhat inexplicably Clements and McMahon state: "Nominally more powerful than the Hunslet 4-4-0Ts, these standard products of Kerr, Stuart were unpopular on the TDLR".  Presumably the 4-4-0Ts on the Cavan & Leitrim. The lack of popularity included a lack of brake power which tended to resttrict them to the Castlegregory branch, and the inside Stephenson link motion.

Fayle, H. The Tralee and Dingle Light Railway. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1937, 43, 47-51.7 illus.
Whitehouse, P.B. and Powell,  A.J. The story of the Tralee & Dingle Light Railway. London, Locomotive Publishing Co., [196 ]. [iv] , 76 p. 34 illus., 6 diagrs. (incl. 3 s.f. & r. els.), tables, 2 maps.

West Clare Railway:
The West Clare Railway was incorporated in 1884 and opened from Ennis to Miltown Malbay on 2 July 1887, and the South Clare Railways on 3 August 1892. TThere was a triangular junction at Moyasta and a network of 52.75 miles. he CIE modernized the motive power by replacing steam with diesel railcars and locomotives, but this policy did not prevent the line from being closed.

Fayle, H. The West Clare Railway. Rly Mag., 1939, 84, 339-45. 5 illus., table, plan, map.
Whitehouse, P.B. The West Clare Railway. Rly Mag., 1951, 97, 296-8. 4 illus., map.

Locomotive summary from Middlemass & Clements & McMahon pp.

No. Name Type Builder WN/date Withdrawn GSR No. coupled wheels cylinders grate area ths boiler pressure Class

1

0-6-0T Bagnall

730/1887

1912

2

0-6-0T Bagnall

738/1887

1900

3

Clifden 0-6-0T Bagnall

793/1887

1922

4

Besborough 0-6-0T Bagnall

794/1887

1901

5

Slieve Callan 0-6-2T Dübs 2890/1892 1952

5C

3ft 6in* 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150 IN1 preserved

6

Saint Senan 0-6-2T Dübs 2891/1892 1956

6C

3ft 6in* 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150 IN1

7

Lady Inchiquin 0-6-2T Dübs 2892/1892 1922 3ft 6in* 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150

8

Lisdoonvarna 2-6-2T Dübs 3169/1894 1925

8C

3ft 6in 15 x20in 11.12 741.8 150 PN1

9

Fergus 2-6-2T T. Green

229/1900

1925

9C

3ft 6in 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150 PN1

2

Ennis 2-6-2T T. Green

234/1900

1955

2C

3ft 6in 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150 PN1 §

4

Liscannor 2-6-2T T. Green

236/1901

1928

4C

3ft 6in 15 x20in 11.18 750.5 150 PN1

10

Lahinch 4-6-0T Kerr Stuart

818/1903

1952

10C

3ft 15 x20in 12 700 160 BN1

11

Kilkee 4-6-0T Bagnall 1881/1909 1953

11C

3ft 6in 15 x20in 11.5 696 160 BN2 µ

1

Kilrush 4-6-0T Hunslet 1098/1912 1953

1C

3ft 9in 15 x20in 11.5 604 160 BN4

2

Ennistymon 4-6-0T Hunslet 1432/1922 1953

3C

3ft 9in 15 x20in 11.5 604 160 BN3

3

Malbay 4-6-0T Hunslet 1433/1922 1956

7C

3ft 9in 15 x20in 11.5 604 160 BN3

*The Dubs 0-6-2Ts had 3ft 6in coupled wheels (originally 4ft), screw reverse, twin injectors, but inadequate cabs which required timber shutters to keep out the Atlantic gales. The cylinders were 15 x 20in and the 150 psi boilers had a 702ft2 total heating surface and 11.18ft2 grate area.
§ used by Bulleid in 1950 for experimental steel firebox with heating surfaces of: tubes 482ft2 and firebox 74ft2

† fitted with pony truck which gave improved ride and improved cab
‡ Design recommended by Board of Works for narrow gauge lines with involvement of Barrington, Consulting Egineer to the WCR. Clements and McMahon consider that the design, rather than the manufacturer, was at fault: the cylinders drove onto the leading coupled axle and this led to the ash pan was over the centre coupled wheel axles. The slide valves were located above the cylinders.
µ Considered a very satisfactory locomotive
¶ No. 11 may have been fitted with Bagnall-Price valve gear; No. 1 certainly was; the final two (and the most modern Irish narrow gauge steam locomotives) were fitted with outside Walschaerts valve gear.
4-6-0T
BN3: 1922 : Carter
4-6-0 tank locomotives, West Clare Railway, Ireland. Loco. Rly Carr. Wago Rev., 1923, 29, 94-5. illus., 2 diagrs. (s. & f. els.), plan.
Includes sectionalized diagrams.
Belfast & North Counties Railway

Malcolm 2-4-0 No. 58

Failure of firebox near Antrim: led to increase in number of boiler examinations. (Currie)

Belfast and County Down Railway:
With the exception of the surburban line from Belfast to Bangor, the system was closed in 1950, shortly after its absorption by the Ulster Transport Authority. It was a small railway, but some post-1923 locomotive development took place. Its locomotive history was interesting in that it extended back to the Bury period. A complication in its history was the existence of a separate Belfast, Holywood & Bangor Railway which obtained locomotives from the BCDR and returned them, plus others to th BCDR in 1884. It is obvious that the "new" (2011) Colourpoint book changes everything: it has now been seen (KPJ) on a brief visit to the NRM (July 2012). It is one of the best railway books ever seen by him, but lacks a really good index (KPJ would gladly have done  one for nothing — the book is so good). DWM fails to record the physical attractiveness of the book (a rare attribute in the 21st century), its less than perfect index, or that the railway had considered electrification in the 1920s.

Coakham, Desmond. The Belfast and County Down Railway. Colourpoint, 256 pp. Reviewed by "DWM" in Backtrack, 2011, 25, 765.
The Belfast & County Down was the smallest of the three main line railway companies serving the North of Ireland. It did exactly what it said on the label, running out from the south eastern suburbs of Belfast along the commuter belt on the shore of Belfast Lough to Bangor and also throwing off a line into rural County Down. This, the 'main line', split at Comber serving the sometime packet port of Donaghadee on the east coast and Downpatrick, Ardglass and Newcastle. The BCDR was linked to the Great Northern of Ireland at its northern and southern extremities, but not to the NCC. The reviewer calls this a 'proper' company history: something which has become quite a rarity in recent years. The author ranges far, wide and deep into his subject, the story is told with style and authority and with a splendid mixture of political, personal and engineering matters covered in appropriate detail. As with all Colourpoint productions, the book is beautifully illustrated with a fine selection of pertinent photographs and is well provided with maps and diagrams. The rise and consolidation of the County Down to its peak in the years leading up to WW1 is recorded in detail. The inter-war years and the competition with road transport and the effect of the WW2 on the railway lead naturally down to the 'nationalisation' of 1948 when the County Down became part of the Ulster Transport Authority. A chapter entitled 'The BCDR as we knew it' gives the author a chance to range over the system at the end of the steam era in word, plan and photograph.
In addition to all the 'background history' of the County Down the author provides details on services, shipping, accidents - which with amazing regularity seem to involve Ballymacarrett Junction just east of the Queen's Quay terminus - signalling and permanent way. Rolling stock and locomotives are thoroughly dealt with. The County Down experimented with diesel traction in the thirties. It used the expertise of the neighbouring Harland &Wolff shipyards to provide a couple of diesel-electrics but on the locomotive side the railway will probably always be associated with the four Beyer, Peacock 'Baltic' tanks it acquired in 1920 - a classic case of 'flattering to deceive!'. The full extent of the locomotive and carriage fleets are listed as a series of tabulated appendices and the book is blessed with a comprehensive index. In his initial acknowledgements the author thanks his publisher 'for undertaking publication of this narrative, hopefully the definitive history of the BCDR'. "It has been a pleasure to review a 'definitive history'; this splendid book comes highly recommended!"

Fayle, H. Belfast & County Down Rly., and its locomotives. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1941, 47, 215-17; 239-41; 262-5: 1942, 48, 12-14; 37-40. 27 illus. (incl. line drawing s.el.), map.
The LAST days of the Belfast & County Down Railway. Rly Mag., 1950, 96, 267-9. 2 illus.
McNeill, D.B. The Belfast and County Down Railway. Rly Obsr, 1935, 7, 216-17. table.
Parkes, G.D. Exit steam on the Belfast & County Down. Rly Wld, 1955, 16, 59-60. 4 illus.
Patterson, E.M. The Belfast & County Down Railway. Lingfield (Surrey), Oakwood Press, 1958. liii , 51 p. + 8 plates. 22 illus., diagr., 2 tables, 2 maps. (Oakwood library of railway history. No. 15).
Includes a chapter on locomotive development and gives a complete listing reproduced below.
Reed, K.H. Locomotives of the B.C.D.R.. Rly Mag., 1939, 84, 416-22.15 illus., table.
Mainly illustrations and tabulated technical data.

The following is based upon Patterson (some of the uncertainty is due to the loss of records during German bombing of Belfast during WW2):
Bury period:
2-2-2: 1848-
Believed to have been 2-2-2 supplied by Bury, Curtis & Kennedy; ordered 1846; delivered 1848. Numbered 1-4. No. 4 was sold in 1858; Nos. 1 and 3 in 1865, but No. 2 probably lasted until about 1883.

2-2-2WT: Fairbairn: 1850-1
Fayle suggested were 2-2-2WT: Numbered as 1 and 2 tank engines until 1859; thence as Nos. 4 and 5. Lasted until 1877 and 1867.

2-4-0T: Beattie patent: Beyer Peacock: 1857-9
Ordered in 1856 (WN 53/1857; 55/1858 and 104/1859). First two had 15 x 22in cylinders and 5ft 6in coupled wheels and last had 12 x 18in cylinders with 5ft coupled wheels. First two lasted until 1896 and 1894. The smaller locomotive may have been withdrawn in 1880: it is illustrated (photograph) in Fig. 8. Coakham adds considerably to this, noting both Beattie's special connections with the North of Ireland; especially with W.R. Anketell of the CDR and his correspondence with Sir John Macneill on coal burning..

0-4-2: Fairbairn: 1859
Two freight engines numbered 8 and 9 which lasted until 1886/7

2-4-0ST: Vulcan Foundry: 1864-
Works numbers: 508/1864; 537-8/1865; 561/1866 and 590/1867 and 793/1876 and 797/1876 were either supplied directly to the BCDR, or in the case of the 1876 locomotives directly to the separate Belfast, Holywood & Bangor Railway. WN 537/8 became BHBR Nos. 1 and 2 in 1870, but returned to the BCDR in 1884 following the Company's absorption. Fig. 2 shows one of these locomotives at Ballynahinch in c1900. The two more recent locomotives remained in sdervice until 1909..

Further Belfast, Holywood & Bangor Railway locomotive: Hawk
A Sharp 2-2-2 (formerly Ulster Railway, and BCDR, perhaps lasted only a few months on absorption; or it may have been ex-Ulster Railway Spitfire; altered to a 2-2-2WT and used on Belfast & Ballymena Railway from 1849 as Hawk; then rebuilt as 2-4-0T being sold to BHBR and used as a ballast engine for Bangor extension.

2-4-0ST: Yorkshire Engine Co.: 1870
WN 151-2 supplied to Belfast, Holywood & Bangor Railway and absorbed into BCDR stock: Withdrawn 1891.

Fowler tank locomotive: 1867
Ordered in 1866; withdrawn in 1882. Numbered as No. 1

2-4-0: Manning Wardle: 1868
WN 261/2: former rebuilt 1874 and 1883; latter in earlier year only. Originally had an American appearance with side window cabs. Running numbers 12 and 13: No. 12 lasted until 1904; No. 13 withdrawn 1888 and possibly cannibalized to keep No. 12 running.

0-6-0: Vulcan: 1875
WN 746. Goods engine, numbered 14; first on line to haul six-wheeled tender. Lasted until 1904.

0-6-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1878
WN 1789: engine was rather like the Vulcan goods; allocated number 4, vacant from scrapping of the original No. 1 tank engine. Lasted until 1922.

R.G. Miller period
First signs of standardisation became evident.

0-4-2 mixed traffic engines: Sharp, Stewart: 1880-1890
WN 2879/1880; 3358/1886; 3392/1887; 3432/1888 and 3615/1890. Running numbers: 2, 9, 10, 13 and 16. All were converted to tank engines in BCDR shops between 1900 and 1902 and thereafter were mainly on shunting and branch line work. No. 9 was in reserve stock from 1945; and was renumbered 28: withdrawn in 1949.

0-4-2: BCDR: 1881
At the Board meeting in February 1882 it was minuted that "A new engine and tender built in the company's workshops has been put upon the line. . " This was numbered 8, and very little data remains, but was probably built from bits and pieces, the main contributions coming from the original no. 2 Bury engine: its life was short.

0-4-2T: Fairbairn/Sharp Stewart
Two engines of chequered history were taken into stock in 1882 and 1883. They appear to have been built by Fairbairn, just before the closure of its works in 1863, and were then acquired by Sharp, Stewart. They were bought by the Newry & Armagh Railway in 1864 and became part of the GNR (I) stock in 1879, which disposed of them as No. 80 and 82, in 1883 and 1882 respectively. Details of their transfer to the BCDR are obscure, but they were considered in detail by H. C. Fayle in The Locomotive. They appear BCDR Nos. 1 and 8: No.8 was withdrawn in 1897, being cannibalised to repair No. 1, which ran until 1909.

2-4-2T: Beyer, Peacock 1891
In 1891 Miller ordered a class of four 2-4-2T engines with inside cylinders compounding on the Worsdell von Borries principle. They were characterised by high-pitched boilers, Walschaerts valve gear, small driving wheels, and short side tanks. They were WN 3358-61; running numbers 18-22. Fig. 9 shows No. 22 in its original state. They mainly worked to Bangor; but proved too rigid on the curves, and the single leading axles were replaced by outside-bearing bogies, becoming 4-4-2Ts in about 1893. Patterson stated that between 1903 and 1905 No. 21 was further altered, when the 18¼ in. by 24 in. "compound cylinders" were removed and temporarily replaced by 17 in. by 24 in. simples: this would seem to imply that the high pressure cylinder was replaced. All scrapped in 1920.

2-4-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1892
WN 3511-13: running numbers 23-5. Wordsdell von Borries compounds (2-cylinder type): cylinders were 16/23¼ in. by 24 in. They were mostly used for main-line working. In 1920 withdrawn and scrapped.

0-6-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1892
Beyer, Peacock supplied a second 0-6-0 engine, which was numbered 26. This engine saw much service on the Donaghadee branch, working both goods and passenger trains, until 1950.

2-4-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1892
The conversion to simples of the compound passenger class of 2-4-0 engines, built in 1892, was anticipated by the building in 1894 of a 2-4-0 simple with 6 ft. driving wheels. This engine far outlasted its fellows; although on the reserve list at the beginning of World War II it was reprieved and was given a Belpaire firebox in 1943, with a boiler identical with the then standard class of 4-4-2 tanks. It proved its worth on Newcastle trains, handling them with elan as late as January 1950. After the closure of the main line it never ran again, and for some years it lay under cover in the motor shed at Queen's Quay before being finally auctioned along with most of its younger brethren on 19 January 1956.

2-4-2T: Beyer, Peacock: 1896-7
Miller extended his standardisation policy in 1896-97 when six 2-4-2Ts were supplied by Beyer, Peacock: WN 3853-4/1896 (running numbers 5 and 7) followed by WN 3868-9/1897 running numbers: 8 and 27 and WN 3882-3 (28 and 29). Driving wheels were 5 ft 6 in. diameter, a standard size on later passenger engines. No. 29 was scrapped in 1923, 8 in 1925, and 28 in 1937. In 1928 Nos. 7 and 27 had their cylinders lined: these two, together with No. 5, worked through WW2. The first two engines of the class (5 and 7) had shorter side tanks than the 1897 versions; Patterson puzzingly stated that No. 27 retained its short side tanks until 1943; when it was brought into line with the other two still running. 5 and 7 went for scrap in 1949; 27 followed in October 1950.

0-6-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1904
A further 0-6-0 goods engine was supplied by Beyer, Peacock (WN 4594) to take over No. 14 from the old Vulcan 0-6-0. This was the first on the line to have a Belpaire firebox, and its total heating surface of 1305 ft2 was the greatest of any engine owned by the company. Later the total heating surface was slightly reduced when a new boiler was fitted. The engine scrapped in 1954.

0-6-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1914
WN 5842 (No. 10) had similar cylinder dimensions to No. 14, but had a larger boiler when new, working at 170 psi with a total heating surface of 1438 ft2. Subsequent reboilering led to reduced working pressure of 160 psi. Scrapped in 1956.

0-6-0: Beyer, Peacock: 1921
A further 0-6-0 goods engine WN 6072/1921 came in 1921, becoming No. 4. It was similar to the 1914 locomotive, but the total heating surface was slightly reduced. It worked excursion trains of up to sixteen 6-wheelers to Newcastle. Withdrawn 1956.

Steam railcars (rail motors): Kitson:
Rowledge states that these were Kitson WN 4296-7/1905 and 4383/1906. Patterson's tabulated data state that were Beyer Peacock products, but text states Kitson. A growth in commuter traffic led to a rail motor service to Holywood from May 1905. Stopping trains ran frequently to Holywood and the Bangor trains were accelerated by omitting stops. Three rail motors came from Kitson: each consisted of a clerestory-roofed coach with a rear-end bogie, the front being rigidly fixed to a 0-4-0 tank engine which could be detached when necessary. The boiler operated at 160 psi and had a Belpaire firebox; total heating surface was 505 ft2. These rail motors were separately numbered from the engine stock. The use of the rail motors was extended to the suburban traffic of east Belfast, and they ran as far as Dundonald. They had a short life being withdrawn after 1918, the engines being scrapped in 1924, but the coach portions were given ordinary bogies and ran until the end of steam workings.

4-4-2T: Beyer, Peacock: 1901-9
Beyer, Peacock built the the largest class of engines on the BCDR. These 4-4-2 tank engines were successfully used on all portions of the system. In spite of their modest tractive effort of 14,292 lbf, they coped with long trains of 6-wheeled carriages to and from Newcastle on Saturday excursions and at holiday times. WN 4231-3/1901 (30, 3 and 15) formed the first batch; WN 4585-6/1904 (11 and 12) followed. All had flush-topped fireboxes when built. Three further engines were added in 1909 (WN 5262-4) numbered 1, 17, and 20. These differed in having Belpaire fireboxes and boiler pressures raised to 175 psi from 160 psi, although later the lower figure was reverted to.

Crosthwait period

4-4-2T: Beyer, Peacock: 1921
Rehabilitation at the end of WW1 resulted in the scrapping of nearly a third of the stock. To replace them, Miller's successor, ordered a further four of the 4-4-2 tanks, and these were delivered in 1921 (WN 6073-4/6091/6098) becoming 13, 18, 19, and 21. Differences from the earlier engines included trailing Cartazzi axles, placed an inch further from the rear coupled wheels. Boiler pressure was 160 psi. Eventually all locomotives in the class were fitted with Belpaire fireboxes.

4-6-4T: Beyer, Peacock: 1920
The literature on the Miller/Crosthwait Baltic tanks is more extensive. Patterson stated that Beyer, Peacock delivered the four "massive" Baltic' tank engines WN 5999-6002 (22, 23, 24 and 25) in 1920. These were a characteristic feature of Bangor workings for over thirty years. The Baltics remained the heaviest tank engines on any Irish line until the introduction of the NCC 2-6-4 tanks from Derby in 1946. They had 19 x 26 in. outside cylinders and Walschaerts valve gear. They never became noted for sprightly performance, and in their latter years, competing with imported ex-NCC tanks, they appeared decidedly sluggish. At the same time their coal consumption became notorious, and a figure of 70 lb. per mile was attributed to them by harassed crews. The total heating surface was 1622 ft2, and tractive effort 19,340 lbf. Water and coal capacity were 2000 gallons and 4 tons respectively, and the weight in working order was over 80 tons. They were scrapped in 1956. Owing to their weight they were kept to the Bangor line, but shortly after delivery it was decided to test the performance of one of them on a heavy stock train over part of the main line. The Fair Day at Ballynahinch led to a Baltic hauling 35 loaded trucks from the branch terminus with a further 15 added at the junction. Thereafter, the sluggish Baltic failed to keep the couplings tight and in one of the hollows past Saintfield the train broke in two places. The performance was repeated near Ballygowan, and the train was brought into Comber piecemeal. The experiment was not repeated.

Fryer, Charles British Baltic tanks: the story of six types of British 4-6-4 tank locomotives. 1993. 56pp.
Ottley 15791: not seen, but recommended by Steamindex user
Scott, W.T. Irish Baltic tanks. Backtrack, 1994, 8, 98-100.
Feature incorrectly attributed to Stott. The Belfast & County Down Railway's 4-6-4T is alleged to be due to pressure from the Directors who had visited the LBSCR and had hoped for something on a similar scale. The Locomotive Superintendent, R.G. Miller refused to become involved in such folly, but his successor J.L. Braithwaite was railroaded into ordering some Baltics from Beyer Peacock. These arrived in 1920, but were heavy of fuel due to a poor front-end. The UTA attempted to improve the design. B&w illus: BCDR No 25 at Belfast Queen's Quay; ex BCDR No 23 now UTA 223 at Belfast.
Rowledge, J.W.P. The County Down Baltic tanks. Backtrack, 1994, 8, 166
See feature above. The expert on Irish locomotives corrects some errors. The successor to R.G. Miller was John L. Crossthwait, not Braithwaite as printed, who joined the company during 1919. The period of gestation for the Co. Down Baltics was rather longer than the author suggests. As early as October 1913 Beyer, Peacock forwarded a proposal for a 2-6-4T, followed by revised versions in November and December 1915. Even if the directors were impressed by the Brighton Baltics in 1916, the 2-6-4T was still in favour when two further schemes were submitted on drawings dated 1st August and 13th October 1917. Then a further version was dated 27th March 1918, being presumably the scheme on which the order was based when confirmed in July 1919 - thus the Baltic was accepted in Miller's time. In view of conditions following the end of the First World War, the railway was very lucky to receive the engines so quickly, the first two in June 1920 and the other two in the next month.

0-6-4T

29: 1923 : Crosthwait/Beyer, Peacock
Patterson states WN 6134; running No. 29. Designed for shunting work in the Belfast dock area and could negotiate curves of 170 ft radius. The boiler and cylinders were identical with the later 4-4-2 tanks. The leading end of the coupling rod was provided with ½ in side play, and the bogie had 5 in side play. During UTA ownership it was used for a time at Queen's Quay and was then taken across to York Road. Scrapped 1956.

New 0-6-4 side-tank locomotive, Belfast and County Down Ry.. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1923, 29, 317. illus.
0-6-4 tank engine, Belfast & County Down Railway. Rly Mag., 1923, 53, 472. illus.

Retrospective and critical

Probert, W.A. The Irish 0-6-4 tanks. Trains ill., 1954, 7, 122-3. 4 illus., table. Addenda pp. 178-9.

4-4-2T

8:1924: Crosthwait/Beyer, Peacock.
Patterson: the last three engines to be added to BCDR stock were essentially heavier versions of the 4-4-2T class. Wheel sizes were the same, but the wheelbase was 2 ft more at 29 ft. 3 in. The boilers were similar to those of the Baltics, as were coal and water capacity. Total heating surface was 1369 ft2 and tractive effort 18,443 lbf. WN 6201-2/ running Nos. 8 and 16 came in 1924, but WN 7139/ running No. 9 arrived in 1945, a few days before the accident which sealed the fate of the company. The weight of these engines, 66 tons, prevented their use on the main line beyond Comber until after 1939. During the war years No. 16 was shedded at Donaghadee. These were also withdrawn in 1956.

NEW Irish locomotives. Rly Mag., 1925, 56, 462. illus.
PASSENGER tank engine, Belfast and County Down Ry.. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1925. 31, 133.4. illus.

World War 2

The railway suffered very serious damage during WW2 and this led to the loan of GSR 428 class 2-4-2T No. 430 from July 1941 to October 1945: this was used on the Ballnahinch branch. Clements and McMahon page 137.


Other Irish Railways

Castlederg & Victoria Bridge Railway
Patterson's Clogher Valley Railway gives brief details of the motive power on this 3ft gauge line: the early locomotives were Kitson 0-4-0s, but in 1904 (according to Patterson) Hudswell Clarke 2-6-0T WN 698 was supplied which cost £1600. The maker's photograph shows it called Victoria, but the name was not carried in service. The locomotive was never turned and was fitted with skirts on one side only. The locomotive was acquired by the Clogher Valley Railway in 1934 and converted into a 2-6-2T at Auchnacloy. Middlemass gave a complete stock list and this is reproduced below:.

No. Name Type Date Maker WN Withdrawn
1 Mourne 0-4-0T 1884 Kitson T108 1904
2 Derg 0-4-0T 1884 Kitson T107 1912
3 0-4-0T 1891 Kitson T257 1928
4 2-6-0T 1904 Hudswell Clarke 698 1933 sold to Clogher Valley Railway
5 0-4-4T 1912 Hudswell Clarke 978 1933
[6] 2-4-0T 1878 Beyer Peacock 1828 1933 bought from NCC in 1928

Narrow gauge locomotive for the Castlederg and Victoria Bridge Railway. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1910, 16, 9. 2 illus.
No. 4 supplied by Hudswell Clarke: 3ft gauge: fitted with condensing gear.

Casserley, H.C. the Castlederg and Victoria Bridge Tramway. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1931, 37, 137-9. 5 illus.
Normally known as a railway. Most of the photographs were taken by the Author: exception being petrol railcar which had been withdrawn by time of visit. General Manager was W.J. Davidson and engineer was G.H. Pollard.

Clogher Valley Railway:
This roadside tramway operated between Maguire's Bridge and Tynan. It opened in 1887 and closed in 1941. It was originally known as the Clogher Valley Tramway. The line was characterised by sharp curves and steep gradients. Also in Middlemass.

The Clogher Valley Ry. Loco. Mag., 1913, 19, 276.
Concentrates on the locomotives (Works Numbers given) and crimson-painted rolling stock
Hurst, E. The Clogher Valley (Light) Railway. Rly Mag., 1900, 7, 315-20
Map. Comment written in pre-automobile era.
Patterson, E.M. The Clogher Valley Railway. 1972.
Wonderful account of what must have been a remarkable line. R.N. Clements is acknowledged for the section on locomotives. Some of the bibliography is recycled in this section, and the notes on the locomotives come from this source.
'VOYAGEUR", pseud. The Clogher Valley Railway. Rly Mag., 1941, 87, 193-5; 212-13. 7 illus., map.

Locomotive stock
The locomotives were designed to run cab first and were fitted with skirts and cowcatchers, and originally with condensers. Sharp Stewart supplied six 0-4-2Ts in 1887: WN 3369-74 and these received the names: Caledon, Errigal, Blackwater, Fury, Colebrooke and Erne. They had large headlamps, originally oil-lamps and later acetylene. The original livery was black, but this was changed to green on the first repaint. J. Tomlinson was the Consulting Engineer. Akalind was responsible for increasing the bunker size. When the condensers were removed the feedwater pumps were replaced by injectors. A trial was made with steam sanding, but the sand got into the motion. In 1910 Hudswell, Clarke (WN 914) supplied an 0-4-4T Blessingbourne, but this lacked adhesion and there were problems with the steam brake. It was withdrawn in 1926. Akerlind was involved in this design. Further developments in steam traction (there were also further developments with diesel railcars and rail tractors) was the acquisition of a 2-6-0T from the Castlederg and Victoria Bridge Tramway in 1934: 2-6-0T (Hudswell, Clark, 698/1904) and its rebuild as a 2-6-2T and the purchase of an Atkinson, Walker 0-4-0T (WN 114/1928): this last was a total disaster as a steam locomotive (Patterson pp. 216-19) and had been recommended by Robert Killin: It did, however, form the basis for a small diesel locomotive (Gardner engine) on the County Donegal Railway where it was named Phoenix and is preserved in this form in Belfast..

2-6-2T

REBUILT tank locomotive, Clogher Valley Rly. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1936, 42, 242. 2 illus.
No.4 a Castlederg and Victoria Bridge Tramway 2-6-0T (Hudswell, Clark, 1904), was acquired and rebuilt as a 2-6-2T at the C.V.R. work shops at Aughnacloy

Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway:
This railway, long-closed, was almost isolated from the rest of the Irish system. The only connection with the rest of the G.S.R. was made through the railways in Cork docks. Clements and McMahon Chapter 6. Locomotive engineers included James Johnstone, briefly his father before him and Thomas Conran..
Chisholm, A.J. A run with an Irish excursion train: an account of how the Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway conducts its excursion traffic. Rly Mag., 1902, 11, 55-60.
Written in the condescending "Colonial" style adopted by some at that time: uses the expression "priest-ridden" without any justification. Purely descriptive. Illus of Argadeen at Ballinascarthy Junction and at Courtmacsherry and US 0-6-0ST No. 19
Cross, L.C. The locomotives of the Cork, Bandon & South Coast Railway. Rly Mag., 1934, 74, 355-61. 9 illus., 5 tables.
Fayle, H. The Cork, Bandon and South Coast Rly. and its locomotives. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1939, 45, 163-5; 219-21; 275-7; 336-8. 26 illus. (incl. 9 line drawings: s. el.)
Shepherd, Ernie. Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway. Hinkley: Midland Publishing, 2005.
Reviewed by Tim Edmonds in J. Rly Canal Hist. Soc., 2006, 35, 311: well received.

4-6-0T
Bandon tanks: Johnstone/Beyer Peacock: 1906-20
GSR Class 463 B4
Clements and McMahon (pp. 162-3) note that the wheel arrangement was unusual and normally associated with the narrow gauge. They do not mention the Whitby tanks on the North Eastern Railway: a design which was virtually contemporaneous, but larger. They were Beyer Peacock WN 4752/1906; 5265/1909; 5413/1910; 5616/1912; 5822/1914; 5954/1919; and 6034 and 6077/1920. As built they had 5ft 2½in coupled wheels; 18 x 24in cylinders; a grate area of 24ft2 and a total heating surface of 1182.5ft2. They were highly regarded by the footplate crews, with the exception of the difficult access to the cab. No. 468 was lent to Grand Canal Street shed for the summer season in 1929 and was well received there. From then until 1956 one was usually sent north to assist with summer services on the DSER section. The last were not withdrawn until 1963. Nock described the class as "very useful".

Ten wheel tank locomotives, Cork, Bandon & South Coast Ry.. Locomotive Mag., 1906, 12, 131. illus.

Rutherford, Michael. The development of the large British passenger tank engine. Part 3. More variety. (Railway Reflections No. 146). Backtrack, 2008, 22, 686-95.
Includes the Bandon tanks.

No. 10
GSR Class 471 B5
Built by Dubs as a 4-4-0T (similar to Class 479): WN 3048/1895. Rebuilt as a 4-4-2T in 1903 and as a 4-6-0T in 1906. It had 5ft 6in coupled wheels, 16 x 22in cylinders, a total heating surface of 839ft2 and a grate area of 14.5ft2. It was withdrawn in 1933. Clements and McMahon pp.. 165-6 .

0-6-0ST
Nos. 6, etc: Beyer Peacock
GSR Classes 472-5: J24 etc
Based on Beyer Paecock 2131 Class, later developed into 3064 Class (presumably latter two belonged to this): both types widely used in British collieries and exported widely. They had 17 x 24in cylinders, 14ft2 grates and with the exception of CSBR No. 6 had a total heating surface 900ft2: No. 6 had 691ft2 having been rebuilt in 1922. Clements and McMahon page. 164

WN date CBSCR GSR No. GSC Class Inchicore coupled wheel diam withdrawn
2046 1881

6

472

472

J24

4ft 6in

1940

2156 1882

12

474

474

J23

4ft 5in

1925

2902 1887

5

475

475

J21

4ft 3in

1939

3288 1890

16

476

475

J21

4ft 3in

1925

3629 1894

17

473

472

J24

4ft 6in

1935

4-4-2T
CBSCR Nos. 3, 9 and 16:
GSR Class 479 C6
Built as 4-4-0Ts by Dubs and Neilson Reid and converted into 4-4-2Ts.

CBSCR No. GSR No. Builder WN Date Rebuilt Withdrawn
3 479 Dubs 2777 1891 1902 1930
9 480 Neilson Reid 4741 1894 1898 1935
18 481 Neilson Reid 4740 1894 1900 1935

All had 5ft 6in coupled wheels, 16 x 22 cylinders and 14.5ft2 grates, but the Dubs locomotive had slightly different boiler dimensions shown in parentheses: tubes 751 (757); firebox 80 (82). The withdrawal date for No. 481 seems somewhat spurious as it was still at work in the summer of 1936, The Dubs locomotyive had laminated springs whereas the other two had helical springs. There were also differences between the cabs and bunkers between the two types. Clements and McMahon page. 168

4-4-0T
CBSCR Nos. 2 and 7: 1875/1901
GSR Class 477 D18
No. 2 originated as a Dubs 2-4-0T in 1875 as WN 861 and was rebuilt as a 4-4-0T in 1908. No. 7 is claimed by Johnstone to have been built (or assembled) at Rocksavage in 1901. The boiler for No. 7 came from one of the spare Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway boilers auctioned when that railway ceased broad gauge operations, and the frames came No. 7, an 0-4-0ST withdrawn in 1897. The locomotives were withdrawn in 1930 and 1934. . Clements and McMahon page. 167.

2-4-0T
CBSCR No. 1
GSR Class 482 G6
Similar to Cork & Macroom Direct Railway Dubs-built 2-4-0Ts (classified as Class 487). WN 760/1874. 5ft coupled wheels; 15 x 22in cylinders; 11.2 ft2 grate area, total heating surface: 830.5ft2. Clements and McMahon  pp. 169.

Cork & Macroom Direct Railway
Operated from its own terminus at Capwell in Cork. Was profitable and resisted amalgamation, after which services diverted to Albert Quay.

2-4-0T
Class 487 G5: Dubs: 1865-81
Very similar (differing in coupled wheel diameter) with Dubs design for Cork & Bandon Railway (GSR Class 482 G6) 5ft 6in coupled wheels; 15 x 21in cylinders; 10.5 ft2 grate area; total haeting surface 760ft2.

CMDR GSR

WN

withdrawn
2 487

18/1865

1928

3 488

235/1867

1934

4 489 1505/1881

1928

No. 488 transferred to Castleisland branch. Clements and McMahon  pp. 174-5.

0-6-2T
C&MDR No. 5
Class 490 I2
Andrew Barclay WN 1022/1905. Withdrawn 1935
5ft 1in coupled wheels; 16 x 24in cylinders; 16 ft2 grate area. Clements and McMahon p. 175.

Contemporary reference
Tank locomotive for the Cork and Macroom Direct Railway. Locomotive Mag., 1908, 14, 33. illus.
This noted that No. 1 (Dübs 1865) (see Locomotive Mag, 8, 8) had been scrapped and had been replaced by an Andrew Barclay. 0-6-2T (WN 1022/1904) with a Webb type radial axle, a total heating surface of 1046ft2 and a 16ft2 grate area. The Belpaire boiler operated at 160 psi and pop type safety valves were fitted. The livery was black with broad vermillion bands with white lining. No. 3 had been repainted in the same livery. The older locomotives were listed as above but the Works Number for No. 3 was listed as WN 236/1867. This also notes that it was rebuilt in 1899, and No. 4 in  1897. Except for No. 3 these retained the sage green livery at that time. Maurice J. Reen was the Locomotive Superintendent.

2-4-2T
Class 491 F5: Robinson: 1891
This 2-4-2T was supplied to the Waterford, Limerick & Western Railway during Robinson's period as Locomotive Superintendent by Vulcan Foundary: WN 1315/1891. It was identical to GSWR Class 267. It was withdrawn in 1934.

Timoleague & Courtmacsherry Light Railway
Ballinascarthy & Timoleague Junction Light Railway opened in 1890 and ran from the CBSCR Clonalkilty branch at Ballinascarthy to Timoleague and thence over a roadside tramway to Courtmacsherry. The company owned three locomotives: an 0-6-0ST Slaney bought from the contractor who built the line: withdrawn 1920. Clements and McMahon pp. 177-8.

2-6-0T
Hunslet WN 611/1894 Argadeen
3ft 6in coupled wheels; 14 x 18in cylinders; grate area 10.2 ft2
Sent to Inchicore for scrapping in 1929, but reboilered with boiler from Imp and lasted until 1957. Clements and McMahon p. 177-8

0-4-2T
St Molaga Class L6
Hunslet WN 520/1890. 3ft 3in coupled wheels; 10½ x 16in cylinders; 6.2 ft2 grate area, Clements and McMahon p. 178.

County Donegal Railways Joint Committee:
This formerly independent 3 ft 0 in gauge railway was acquired jointly by the NCC and GNR (I) in 1906, but was operated as separate unit. It had begun life as an Irish standard gauge line (the Finn Valley Railway) between Strabane and Stranolar which was incorporated in 1863 and was converted to 3ft gauge in a single weekend in July 1894 (Notwork Rail please note). The earliest diesel railcars to operate in the British Isles were owned by the CDRJC and this policy, plus the poor Donegal roads, enabled the line to remain open until 1960. In addition to the railcars, a stock of pre-1923 4-6-4Ts and 2-6-4Ts was maintained. Patterson's book provides a detailed history of this company. A locomotive stock list is taken from Middlemass.
Standard gauge Finn Valley Railway (West Donegal Railway) locomotives
Three Sharp Stewart 2-4-0Ts WN 3021-3 of 1881 worked the line: These were numbered (but not in WN sequence) and were named Alice, Blanche and Lydia. Alice lasted until 1926 finding work elsewhere.
Donegal Railway

No.

Name

Type

Date

Builder

WN

Withdrawn

4

Meenglas

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4573

1935

5

Drumboe

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4574

1931

6

Inver

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4575

1931

7

Finn

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4576

1931

8

Foyle

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4577

1937

9

Columbkille

4-6-0T

1893

Neilson

4578

1932

10

Sir James

4-4-4T

1902

Neilson

6103

1933

11

Hercules

4-4-4T

1902

Neilson

6104

1933

12

Eske

4-6-4T

1904

Nasmyth Wilson

697

1954

13

Owenea

4-6-4T

1904

Nasmyth Wilson

698

1952

14

Erne

4-6-4T

1904

Nasmyth Wilson

699

1961

15

Mourne

4-6-4T

1904

Nasmyth Wilson

700

1952

County Donegal Railways Joint Committee: all 2-6-4Ts supplied by Nasmyth Wilson in two batches, one in 1907 and one in 1912:

No. Name WN Withdrawn
16 Donegal/Meenglas 828/1907
17 Glenties/Drumboe 829/1907
18 Killybegs/Columbkille 830/1907
19 Letterkenny/Finn 831/1907 1940
20 Raphoe/Foyle 832/1907 1955
21 Ballyshannon/Alice 958/1912 1961
22 Stranolar/Blanche 956/1912

1959

23 Stabane/Lydia 957/1912 1961

Contemporary
New tank locomotives, County Donegal Joint Committee. Loco. Mag., 1909, 15, 9.
2-6-4T type supplied by Nasmyth Wilson (WN 828-32) to the specification and drawings of R. Livesey. Notes standard green livery, major dimensions and intended ability to haul 120 tons up a gradient of 1 in 50. See also Souvenir with December Issue.

Begley, Joe, Dave Bell, Steve Flanders, and Dave White. County Donegal Railway: a visitor's guide. Donegal Railway Restoration Society, 1996. 120p.
Casserley, H.C. Britain's joint lines. London, Ian Allan, 1968. 224 p. 233 illus., 11 tables. Includes notes and data on the C.D.J.R. locomotive stock.
Patterson, E.M. The County Donegal Railways. 1962.
Chapter 7 (pp. 145-78) covers motive power and rolling stock: includes six dimensional sketches of steam locomotives by G.T. Glover
Rowbotham, Robert. The story of the ‘Wee Donegal'. Narrow Gauge Wld, 1999, 1, (3), 18-20.
Includes colour illus. of Blanche and Foyle
Salter, R.W.A. The County Donegal Railways. Rly Mag., 1931, 68, 125-30. 7 illus., map.
Smith, WA.C. The County Donegal Railways. Rly Mag., 1957, 103, 297-303 +. 8 illus., map.

www.trainweb.org/i3/locos.htm#l_by_l is an interesting website

4-6-4T

Scott, W.T. Irish Baltic tanks. Backtrack, 1994, 8, 98-100.
Feature incorrectly attributed to Stott. The County Donegal Railway 4-6-4Ts were supplied by Nasmyth Wilson in 1904, and were originally unsuperheated, but were superheated from 1920. They were heavy on coal consumption and were displaced by the later 2-6-4Ts. B&w illus: CDR No 11 Erne at Raphoe; CDR No 9 Eske leaves Londonderry (Derry) on passenger train in July 1953 with Craigavon bridge in background; CDR No 9 Eske at Londonderry;
Scott, W.T. Reflections on the narrow gauge (letter). Backtrack, 2007, 21, 509.
See colour pictures within feature by Michael Rutherford beginning on page 311: both relate to powerful locomotives working in Donegal: amplifies the information on the CDJR 4-6-4T shown at Strabane which  weighed 45 tons and could haul 445 tons on the level and 175 tons over Barnesmore Bank (the mixed gauge turntable visible was for turning wagons, not locomotives)

Dublin & Blessington Steam Tramway
This connected the Dublin Tramways which were electrified in 1898 at its outer terminus at Terenure with Blessington, and eventually with Poulaphouca. The section between Terenure and Blessington opened in 1888. The line closed in 1932. There were heavy gradients (1 in 20) on the outer part of the line where a summit of 700ft above sea level was reached. The information provided is from the Locomotion Paper. Also in Middlemass

Fayle, H. and Newham, A.T. The Dublin & Blessington Steam Tramway. Lingfield. 1963. 32pp. (Locomotion papers No. 20)
The first six locomotives were enclosed tramway 0-4-0 well tanks, built by the Falcon Works, Loughborough, in 1887. Saddle tanks were added later to increase water capacity. The dimensions were: inside cylinders 9 x 14 in., wheels 2 ft. 6 in., boiler pressure 175 psi, tanks 230 gallons., coal half-ton, weight 11 tons. They cost £900 each. The Works Numbers were probably 125-130, but the running numbers did not correspond. Ball governors limited speed to 14 mile/h, but these were soon removed, and thereafter these engines, which were known as the "kettles," sometimes attained 40 mile/h. No.4 was put to drive machinery at Templeogue in 1894. The others were scrapped as follows: No.2 in 1906, No.5 about 1911, No.1 in 1912, No.3 lasted till 1927, and No.6 received a complete rebuild at Broadstone Works, Midland Great Western Ry., in about 1914. Previously there was a duplicate set of driving levers at the smokebox end of the engine; the boiler was moved forward on the chassis, leaving more room at the rear, and the front controls were removed. This engine lasted until closure in 1932. In later years these engines were confined as much as possible to the easier section of the line between Terenure and Jobstown.

It was soon found that the capacity of the original type of locomotive was severely taxed on the long steep gradient between Embankment and Crooksling, the maximum load under the best weather conditions being two bogie coaches. In 1892, No.7, the first of a larger type with a 2-4-2 wheel arrangement, was supplied by Thos. Green & Son of Leeds: WN. 179. No.7 was virtually a railway locomotive with a duplicate cab at the front end used by the driver when running forward direction, as there were no turntables; the fireman always remained at the rear. A makers' photograph shows wheelcovers, but these were removed, and a longer chimney fitted to clear the top decks of the passenger cars. The dimensions were: cylinders 13 x 20 in., coupled wheels 3 ft. 6 in., leading and trailing wheels (Bissel trucks) 2 ft., coupled wheelbase 6 ft., side tanks holding 630 gallons., coal 1¾ tons, weight full 33 tons. No.7 was not used a great deal, and was rebuilt in 1910, and disposed of in 1915, having been found too heavy for the light track.

The next engine, No.8, was somewhat similar, but smaller and was at first an 0-4-2T type: it was supplied by Thos. Green: WN 218/1896. The cylinders were 13 x 18 in., coupled wheels 3 ft. 3 in., trailing wheels 1 ft. 10 in., coupled wheelbase 5 ft. 6 in., tanks 350 gals., coal 1¾ tons, weight full 27 tons. In 1903 it was rebuilt as a 2-4-2T at a cost of £100, and was then similar to the next engine, No.9, with a weight of 29 tons. No.9 was built by the Brush Engineering Works, Loughborough, in 1899, WN 284. It had modified Bissel trucks, the invention of Mr. W. Guilfoyle, the locomotive superintendent. The dimensions were similar to No.8 as rebuilt. No.8 was withdrawn in 1915, but No.9 lasted to the closing ofthe line in 1932.

In 1906 No.2, another 2-4-2T and similar in appearance to No. 9, was supplied by Thos. Green: WN 267. In 1915 this was renumbered 10, as the company wished to stress that it was the newest engine. The leading dimensions were: cylinders 12 x 18 in., coupled wheels 3 ft. 0¼ in., leading and trailing wheels (Bissel trucks) 2 ft. Like No.9, No. 10 lasted until closure in 1932.

On Bank Holidays one of the larger engines could take as many as five coaches over the entire distance, and if the train was longer a pilot was provided on the 1 in 20 incline; banking could not be employed as the couplings were too weak. Goods trains in the down direction were sometimes made up to twenty or more four-wheeled trucks and vans, but the endeavour was to work mixed trains as far as possible.

During WW1 the financial state of the undertaking declined due to higher wages and costs. In 1916 the Company acquired a 0-4-0 well tank locomotive from the Dublin and South Eastern Ry. It had originally formed part of one of the two steam railmotor cars obtained in 1905 from Kerr Stuart & Co., but owing to the excessive vibration, the engines were detached from the cars and used as separate units. The side tanks were removed and well tanks fitted instead, as well as heavy balance weights in the rear. The cylinders were 12 in. by 16 in., wheels 3 ft. 7 in., boiler 3 ft. 8 in. by 5 ft. 8 in; weight in working order 23 tons 14 cwt. The engine had carried the number 70 on the D. & S.E.R. and became No.2 on the Blessington Tramway, although it never carried this number. It only worked a short time, having been found too heavy for the track, and the outside cylinders and motion fouled various points, so that much trouble was experienced.

This last engine was exchanged for an 0-4-0ST named. Cambria from the Great Southern Rlys. in 1918. Cambria had originally been built in 1894 by the Hunslet Engine Co., Leeds, for Joseph Buggins & Son, the contractors for the Wexford and Rosslare Rly. The cylinders were 10 x 15 in., coupled wheels 2 ft. 10 in., grate area 5½ ft2., boiler pressure 140psi, weight in working order, 16 tons. It was fitted with a longer chimney to. clear the top decks of the passenger cars, and was numbered 5 in the Blessington stock. It lasted till 1928, and could take 33 wagons.

In the 1920s Ford and Drewry railcars were introduced and the steam locomotives gradually decayed: even the vacuum brake gear fell into disuse.

Dublin & Lucan Tramway 
Opened on 2 July 1883. Formed an extension from the Dublin tramway network, but to a different gauge: following closure (29 January 1925) and reconstruction to the 5ft 3in gauge and electrification it reopened on 27 May 1928 as part of the Dublin United Tramway system. As a steam tramway it had opened with a 2-4-2 tramway locomotive supplied by Manlove, Alliot & Fryer of Nottingham to a design by Edward Perrett. The other tramway engines were Kitson T57/1883; T74/1883; T81/1883; T104/1884; T108/1884; T224/1887 and Green 169/1992.

Dundalk, Newry & Greenore Railway:
This railway was owned by the LMS (formerly the LNWR), but was worked by the GNR (I) from 1933. The motive power and rolling stock, which was retained after the 1933 agreement, consisted of Victorian LNWR equipment adapted for the broad gauge. The locomotives were Ramsbottom 0-6-0STs.

Barrie, D.S.M. The Dundalk, Newry & Greenore Railway and the Holyhead-Greenore steamship service. Lingfield (Surrey), Oakwood Press, 1957. [ii] , 68 p. + col. front. 40 illus. (incl. 2 ports.), 3 plans, map. Bibliog.
Livesay, H.M. The Dundalk, Newry & Greenore Railway. Railways, 1951, 12, 220-2. 2 illus.

The Listowel and Ballybunion Railway
Lartigue monorail system opened in March 1888 and worked by three Hunslet 0-3-0Ts with twin boilers with a total heating surface of 71.75 ft2. The cylinders were 7 x 12 in and the driving wheels were 2ft in diameter. Locomotive livery was dark green

Barton, H.H.C. Monorails. J. Instn Loco,. Engrs., 1962, 52, 8-33. Disc.: 34-59.Paper No. 631).
Hunslet locomotive illustrated.
Goodman, F. The Listowel and Ballybunion Railway. Rly Mag., 1900, 7, 163-8.
Includes works photograph of one of locomotives. Notes visit by members of the International Railway Congress in 1895.

Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway:
This narrow gauge railway had a long mainline from Londonderry to Burtonport (Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway not opened until 1903: contemporary account below), in western Donegal, and another line to Carndonagh in the north of the same county. These long distances made large locomotives necessary and both 4-8-0s and 4-8-4Ts were operated. The latter had a tractive effort of 17,350 lbf and, on this basis, were the most powerful narrow gauge engines in the British Isles. The line suffered a verious accident on 30 January 1925 when a train was blown off the Owencarrow viaduct in a gale: four were killed. Middlemass notes that the railway began as a 5ft 3in gauge line between Londonderry and Buncrana on Lough Swilly and was originally known as the Lough Foyle & Lough Swilly Railway. Bus replacement began on 3 June 1940 when the section between Gweedore and Burtonport closed to all traffic.

Casserley, H.C. Closure of the Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway. Rly Mag., 1953, 99, 701-5. 8 illus. Errata p. 785.
Patterson, E.M. Exit.... the Londonderry and Lough Swilly Railway. Rly Wld, 1953, 14,,61-3.3 illus.
Patterson, E.M. The Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway. 1964.

Letterkenny and Burtonport Railway. Rly Mag., 1903, 13, 120-3.
Long (49 miles) extension to Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway opened in 1903. The 4-6-0Ts constructed for the Extension by Andrew Barclay are described and illustrated: these were lettered L&BER (two illustrated).

Broad gauge locomotives
These were all 0-6-0T and were sold when the line was converted to 3ft gauge on 28 March 1885 (the conversion was completed in a single weekend: perhaps Notwork Rail should investigate).. These were: two from Gilkes, Wilkinson: WN 141-2/1885 (these had been subscontracted from Fossick & Hackworth according to Lowe (p. 178); two from R. Stephenson: WN 1609-19/1864 and Sharp Stewart WN 2645/1876 and 2836/1879. The last two were named St Patrick and St Columb. One of the Gilkes locomotives was sold to the Belfast Central Railway and the two Stephenson locomotives were sold to the Londonderry Port & Harbour Commissioners.

Narrow gauge locomotives

No.

Name

Type

Date

Builder

WN

Withdrawn

1

J,T. Mackay

0-6-2T

1882

Black, Hawthorn

684

1911

2

Londonderry

0-6-2T

1883

Black, Hawthorn

742

1912

3

Donegal

0-6-2T

1883

Black, Hawthorn

743

1913

4

Innishowen

0-6-0T

1885

Black, Hawthorn

834

1940

5

2-4-0T

1873

R. Stephenson

2088

1900

6

2-4-0T

1873

R. Stephenson

2089

1900

5

4-6-2T

1899

Hudswell Clarke

518

1954

6

4-6-2T

1899

Hudswell Clarke

519

1953

7

King Edward VII

4-6-2T

1901

Hudswell Clarke

577

1940

8

4-6-2T

1901

Hudswell Clarke

562

1954

9

Aberfoyle

4-6-2T

1904

Kerr Stuart

845

1928

10

Richmond

4-6-2T

1904

Kerr Stuart

856

1954

11

4-8-0

1905

Hudswell Clarke

746

1933

12

4-8-0

1905

Hudswell Clarke

747

1954

13

4-6-2T

1910

Hawthorn Leslie

2801

1940

Became L&BER stock

14

4-6-2T

1910

Hawthorn Leslie

2802

1943

Became L&BER stock

5

4-8-4T

1912

Hudswell Clarke

985

1954

Originally L&BER stock: specific mention in Lowe p. 339

6

4-8-4T

1912

Hudswell Clarke

986

1954

Originally L&BER stock: specific mention in Lowe p. 339

1

4-6-0T

1902

Andrew Barclay

933

1940

Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway

2

4-6-0T

1902

Andrew Barclay

934

1954

Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway

3

4-6-0T

1902

Andrew Barclay

935

1954

Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway

4

4-6-0T

1902

Andrew Barclay

936

1953

Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway

4-8-0

Carling, D.R. 4-8-0 tender locomotives.
Built to the requirements of J. Connor by Hudswell Clark. Beyer Peacock had tendered unsuccessfully. They were built for the Burtonport Extension and had to be able to cope with 4 mile gradients at 1 in 40. Carling stated that they were "more akin to those built for narrow gauge in Africa, Australia or India than to those for European main lines".
Rutherford, Michael. More eight-coupled: a miscellany. (Railway Reflections No.127). Backtrack, 2007, 21, 44-51.
Based on Carling: Ahrons cited Locomotive, 1912, Oct. 15

4-8-4T

Scott, W.T. The Lough Swilly's eight coupled engines. Rly Wld, 1982, 43, 626-8.
Hudswell Clarke 4-8-0s (WN 746-7/1905) and 4-8-4Ts (WN 985-6/1912) were supplied for the Letterkenny & Burtonport Extension Railway (and 4-8-4T No. 5 is shown with this lettering). The 4-8-4Ts were very powerful locomotives and tended to work to Buncrana, handling heavy traffic during WW1.
Scott, W.T. Reflections on the narrow gauge (letter). Backtrack, 2007, 21, 509.
See colour pictures within feature by Michael Rutherford beginning on page 311: both relate to powerful locomotives working in Donegal: amplifies the information on the Swilly 4-8-4T which notes that they were moved from the Burtonport Extension to the Buncrana line in 1914 to work the heavy naval traffic during WW1. Also notes the pride which Hudswell Clarke had in these large locomotives (it featured them in its catalogues): but they weighed nearly 60 tons, well over the quoted 51.5.

Londonderry Port and Harbour Commissioners:
This railway had a mixed gauge system (5 ft 3 in and 3 ft 0 in), but only broad gauge locomotives were operated.

The RAILWAYS of the Londonderry Port and Harbour Commissioners. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1934, 40, 379-81. 4 illus.

Portrush and Giant's Causeway Tramway

Rutherford, Michael. Electric Light Railways - A lost opportunity? (Railway reflections [No. 48]). Backtrack,.  12, 680-9.
Interesting analysis of the problems of classification which leads to some things being left out. For instance, when the Museum of Transport at Clapham was closed most of the exhibits were sent to York and those relating to London eventually formed the Covent Garden collection, but some exhibits fell into a sort of limbo. Furthermore, the NRM excluses certain forms of related transport, such as urban tramways. Rutherford notes that "demarkation is somewaht arbitrary". The history of lighter railways in Britain began with The Railway Construction Fascilities Act of 1864, The Regulation of Railways Act of 1868 which recognized the light railway concept, the 1870 Tramways Act (for street tramways), and the Light Railways Act of 1896 which was used for many urban tramways. Refers to a study by Peter Bosley (details not given but see books). Electrification was manifested on the Portrush and Bushmills, Bessbrook & Newry, and other Irish tramways.
Vickers, R.L. Electric trains in Ireland. Backtrack, 2003, 17. 635-40.
Mainly concerns the Giant's Causeway, Portrush & Bushmills Tramway. This was engineered by William Atchison Traill and his brother Dr Anthont Traill, both of whom had scientific backgrounds. Sir William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) and Dr William Siemens both bought shares in the venture and Dr Edward Hopkinson was a consultant. An Act was obtained in 1880. William Traill patented both a conduit system and a contact system for the supply of electricity to railway vehicles (full details given), but having experimented with a two-rail system the third rail system was adopted (a caption p. 636 lower is used to explain that the less troublesome overhead supply was adopted in July 1899). The line opened on 29 January 1883 with steam traction, but experiments with electric traction began in May/June and progress was limited until hydro-electric power became available. Revenue earning electric traction began on 28 September 1883. Steam traction had to be used on the street sections until 1899. The story of William Traill and Edward Hopkinson sitting on the third rail to convince the Board of Trade inspectors that it was "safe" is repeated as is that of Lord Kelvin giving a shocking handshake to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. The line was extended to the Giant's Causeway on 1 July 1887. The author has made extensive use of J.H. MacGuigan's The Giant's Causeway Tramway, 1964 (Ottley 1847). During WW1 the line was involved in a battle with a German U-boat. Following a period of prosperity during WW2, this historic line closed in 1950. Other lines considered in farn less detail include the Bessbrook & Newry Railway opened on 1 October 1885. This was developed by James Nicholas Richardson with Mather & Platt equipment and the expertise of Dr Edward Hopkinson. This used hydro-electricity and third rail except over a level crossing where overhead supply was used. The line closed in 1948, but acted as the inspiration for electric traction on the City & South London Railway. The Dublin & Lucan Tramway is mentioned: this opened on 8 March 1900. Drumm battery electric railcars operated on the Dublin to Bray lines between 1932 and 1950 and the Dublin Area Rapid Transit system opened on 23 July 1893. Sources are cited, notably J.C. Gilham's The age of the electric train. Ian Allan, 1988 (Ottley 15615). See letter from D.K. Horne (page 715) concerning William Atcheson Traill's son Anthony who was ordered to sit on the live rail as a child, the Engineering Department at Trinity College and the Clontarf to Howth tram.

Portstewart Tramway
Opened June 1882. Closed 31 January 1926. 3ft gauge. Worked by three Kitson tramway engines: T56/1882; T84/1883 (preserved and extant) and T302/1901. Middlemass

Portstewart Tramway. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1944, 50, 138-9.

Sligo, Leitrim & Northern Counties Railway:
This was a small broad gauge railway which connected Sligo with Enniskillen. An unusual feature of the locomotive stock was that it was named, but not numbered.

NcNeill, D.B. The Sligo, Leitrim & Northern Counties Railway. Rly Mag., 1956, 102, 330-7. 6 illus. table, map.
Parker, W.  The Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Railway. Rly Mag., 1924, 55, 101-5. 3 illus., table, map.

Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Ry. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1932, 38, 120.
Purchase of GNR(I) 0-6-0 No. 149 and named Sligo.

4-4-0

Sligo Leitrim and Northern Counties Ry. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1922, 28, 25
Purchase of two 4-4-0s from Great Northern Railway (Ireland); also notes purchase of 0-6-4T from Beyer Peacock & Co. in 1917

[Two GNR (I.) 4-4-0s (Nos. 118 and 119) acquired by the S.L. & N.C.R. and named Black Lion and Glencar respectively]. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1924, 30, 294.

0-6-4T

Lough Erne/Lough Melvin: 1949:
In 1882 the SLNCR purchased two 0-6-4Ts from Beyer, Peacock and further additions of the same type were made between then and 1917. In 1949 two more locomotives were leased from Beyer, Peacock. These were similar to the 1882 design, but incorporated some modifications.

Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Railway. Loco. Rly Carr. Wagon Rev., 1951, 57,145. illus.

Retrospective and critical

Probert, W.J. The Irish 0-6-4 tanks. Trains ill., 1954, 7, 122-3. 4 illus., table. Addenda p. 178-9.

Waterford and Tramore Railway:
This line, opened in 1853, was completely isolated from the other Irish railways. All repairs were conducted at Manor Station in Waterford. Until 1935 a 2-2-2WT formed part of the motive power. A loophole in the legislation relating to continuous brakes enabled the line to be operated without them until 1933. The locomotive coal was carried within a bunker within the cabs. Clements and McMahon  pp. 170-3..
Casserley, H.C. Locomotive cavalcade. Berkhamsted: author, 1952. page 118.
2-2-2WT [GSR No. 483] entering Waterford in 1934
Fayle, H. The Waterford and Tramore Railway. J. Stephenson Loco. Soc., 1948, 24, 114-19 + plate. 3 illus.
Fayle H. and Newham, A.T. The Waterford & Tramore Railway. Dawlish (Devon), David & Charles, 1964. (2nd ed. 1972). 48 p. + 12 plates. 38 illus., diagr., 3 plans, map.

2-2-2T
GSR Class 483 N1
Nos. 1 and 2 built by Fairbairn in 1855 and rebuilt in 1895 and 1897 when larger boilers supplied by Avonside were fitted. No. 1 was fitted with a Hawthorn Leslie boiler in 1924 and had been fitted with the vacuum brake by 1930. New cabs, bumkers and tanks were fitted in about 1910. The leading dimensions were: 5ft driving wheels, 13 x 18in cylinders, 11.25ft2 grate area and 631.1ft2 total heating surface. In the summer of 1926 No. 2 received a substantial boiler overhaul and the locomotive received GSR grey, but it was withdrawn in October 1926. The singles were capable of 40 to 45 mile/h. No. 1 worked on and there were hopes that it might be preserved, but on 24 August 1935 it was derailed at Carriglong and was cut up at the site. Clements and McMahon  page 171

0-4-2WT
GSR Class 483 L3
Waterford & Tramore No. 3 supplied by Slaughter Gruning: WN 452/1861. The GSR number was probably not carried. The locomotive had 5ft coupled wheels and 15 x 22in cylinders, but according to Clements and McMahon  page 172 the heating dimensions were not recorded. It broke a crank axle and was withdrawn in 1930.

GSR Class 486 L1
Waterford & Tramore No. 4 supplied by Andrew Barclay: WN 1137/1908. It had 4ft 6in coupled wheels, 15 x 22in cylinders, 12ft2 grate area and 918ft2 total heating surface. Its performance was sluggish and it was withdrawn when the boiler wore out in 1941. Clements and McMahon  page 173 ..

Very early locomotives

Bury Curtis & Kennedy locomotives were supplied to the Great Southern Railway and to the Belfast & Ballymena Railway Railway according to Rowledge's Irish steam loco register. According to Marshall's Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway V. 3 p. 60 these bar-framed six-wheeled engines built for the 5ft 3in gauge lasted much longer, presumably due to the greater width available.

Updated: 2014-06-06

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